publication . Book . 2012

Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles, and Politics

Brett Greatley-Hirsch; Brett Greatley-Hirsch;
Open Access English
  • Published: 20 Dec 2012
  • Publisher: Open Book Publishers
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
Academic institutions are starting to recognize the growing public interest in digital humanities research, and there is an increasing demand from students for formal training in its methods. Despite the pressure on practitioners to develop innovative courses, scholarship in this area has tended to focus on research methods, theories and results rather than critical pedagogy and the actual practice of teaching. The essays in this collection offer a timely intervention in digital humanities scholarship, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of humanities disciplines across the world. The first section offers views on the practical rea...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
ACM Computing Classification System: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
free text keywords: teaching digital humanities, website development, media studies, humanities, H, JNM, JNT, Library science, Pedagogy, Web development, business.industry, business, Political science, Humanities computing, Scholarly communication, Politics, Digital humanities
Funded by
WT
Project
  • Funder: Wellcome Trust (WT)
Communities
DARIAH EU
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
242 references, page 1 of 17

-. “The Life of Genre, the Life in the Classroom.” Genre and Writing: Issues, Arguments, Alternatives, edited by Wendy Bishop and Hans A. Ostrom. Portsmouth: Heinemann, 1997. 19-26.

Benkler, Yochai. The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Benjamin, Walter. Charles Baudelaire: A Lyric Poet in the Era of High Capitalism, translated by Harry Zohn. London: Verso, 1983.

-. “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” Illuminations: Essays and Reflections, edited by Hannah Arendt and translated by Harry Zohn. New York: Schocken Books, 1969. 217-51.

Bennett, Sue, Karl Maton, and Lisa Kervin. “The 'Digital Natives' Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence.” British Journal of Educational Technology 39, no. 5 (2008): 775-86.

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. London: British Broadcasting Corporation, 1972; Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972.

Bernard-Donals, Michael. “It's Not about the Book.” Profession (2008): 172-84.

Berners-Lee, Tim. “WorldWideWeb: Summary.” alt.hypertext, August 6, 1991, http:// groups.google.com/group/alt.hypertext/msg/395f282a67a1916c.

Bernstein, Rachel, and Paul Mattingly. “The Pedagogy of Public History.” Journal of American Ethnic History 18, no. 1 (1998): 77-92.

Birkerts, Sven. “Resisting the Kindle.” Atlantic Monthly, March 2, 2009, http://www. theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2009/03/resisting-the-kindle/7345/.

Bjork, Olin, and John Pedro Schwartz. “What Composition Can Learn from the Digital Humanities.” Paper presented at the MLA Annual Convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 29, 2009.

Blackwell, Christopher, and Gregory Crane. “Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and Classics in a Digital Age.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 3, no. 1 (2009), http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000035/000035.html.

Bloom, Benjamin S. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: The Cognitive Domain. New York: David McKay, 1956.

“Bloomsburg U. Undergraduate 'Manifesto' on Digital Humanities.” 4Humanities, December, 2010, http://humanistica.ualberta.ca/bloomsburg-u-undergraduatemanifesto-on-digital-humanities/.

Bodenhamer, David J., John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris, ed. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.

242 references, page 1 of 17
Abstract
Academic institutions are starting to recognize the growing public interest in digital humanities research, and there is an increasing demand from students for formal training in its methods. Despite the pressure on practitioners to develop innovative courses, scholarship in this area has tended to focus on research methods, theories and results rather than critical pedagogy and the actual practice of teaching. The essays in this collection offer a timely intervention in digital humanities scholarship, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of humanities disciplines across the world. The first section offers views on the practical rea...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
ACM Computing Classification System: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
free text keywords: teaching digital humanities, website development, media studies, humanities, H, JNM, JNT, Library science, Pedagogy, Web development, business.industry, business, Political science, Humanities computing, Scholarly communication, Politics, Digital humanities
Funded by
WT
Project
  • Funder: Wellcome Trust (WT)
Communities
DARIAH EU
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
242 references, page 1 of 17

-. “The Life of Genre, the Life in the Classroom.” Genre and Writing: Issues, Arguments, Alternatives, edited by Wendy Bishop and Hans A. Ostrom. Portsmouth: Heinemann, 1997. 19-26.

Benkler, Yochai. The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Benjamin, Walter. Charles Baudelaire: A Lyric Poet in the Era of High Capitalism, translated by Harry Zohn. London: Verso, 1983.

-. “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” Illuminations: Essays and Reflections, edited by Hannah Arendt and translated by Harry Zohn. New York: Schocken Books, 1969. 217-51.

Bennett, Sue, Karl Maton, and Lisa Kervin. “The 'Digital Natives' Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence.” British Journal of Educational Technology 39, no. 5 (2008): 775-86.

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. London: British Broadcasting Corporation, 1972; Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972.

Bernard-Donals, Michael. “It's Not about the Book.” Profession (2008): 172-84.

Berners-Lee, Tim. “WorldWideWeb: Summary.” alt.hypertext, August 6, 1991, http:// groups.google.com/group/alt.hypertext/msg/395f282a67a1916c.

Bernstein, Rachel, and Paul Mattingly. “The Pedagogy of Public History.” Journal of American Ethnic History 18, no. 1 (1998): 77-92.

Birkerts, Sven. “Resisting the Kindle.” Atlantic Monthly, March 2, 2009, http://www. theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2009/03/resisting-the-kindle/7345/.

Bjork, Olin, and John Pedro Schwartz. “What Composition Can Learn from the Digital Humanities.” Paper presented at the MLA Annual Convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 29, 2009.

Blackwell, Christopher, and Gregory Crane. “Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and Classics in a Digital Age.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 3, no. 1 (2009), http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000035/000035.html.

Bloom, Benjamin S. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: The Cognitive Domain. New York: David McKay, 1956.

“Bloomsburg U. Undergraduate 'Manifesto' on Digital Humanities.” 4Humanities, December, 2010, http://humanistica.ualberta.ca/bloomsburg-u-undergraduatemanifesto-on-digital-humanities/.

Bodenhamer, David J., John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris, ed. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.

242 references, page 1 of 17
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