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30 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • DARIAH EU
  • Publications
  • 2013-2022
  • NARCIS

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Article . 2017
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; LS Psycholinguistiek; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zeldenrust, D.A.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands

    In this chapter I will describe what the CLARIN infrastructure is and how it can be used, with a focus on the Low Countries (and especially the Netherlands) part of the CLARIN infrastructure. I aim to explain how a Humanities researcher can use the CLARIN infrastructure. I describe the basic functionality that CLARIN aims to offer, including searching for data and software, applying software to data, and storing data and software resulting from research.

  • Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Dillo, I.; De Leeuw, Lisa; de Jong, A.S.M.; van Trier, G.M.; Sieverts, Eric; Koren, Marian;
    Publisher: Vakmedianet
    Country: Netherlands

    If we want to share data, the long-term storage of those data in a trustworthy digital archive is an essential condition. Trust is the basis of storing and sharing data. That trust must be present in the various stakeholders involved. Certification of digital archives can make an important contribution to the confidence of these stakeholders in the digital archives. Ten years ago DANS was assigned the task of developing a Seal of Approval for digital data to ensure that archived data can still be found, understood and used in the future. In 2009 this Data Seal of Approval (DSA) was transferred to an international body, the DSA Board, which has managed and further developed the guidelines and the peer review process ever since. The objectives of the DSA are to safeguard data, ensure high quality and guide reliable management of data for the future without requiring implementation of new standards, regulations or heavy investments. The DSA contains 16 guidelines for applying and verifying quality aspects concerning the creation, storage, use and reuse of digital data. Based on feedback from data archives that applied for a DSA and different case studies we have gained some insight into the benefits of DSA. Still, the impact of having the Seal is not easy to measure. Seal holders usually refer to qualitative benefits in the form of increased awareness of the value of their repositories to their communities, funders and publishers. Ten years down the line we can safely state that the Data Seal of Approval has proven its added value. If we try to look five years into the future, what can we expect? There are different developments: a growing interest in DSA among European research infrastructures, the collaboration between DSA and the ISCU World Data System under the umbrella of the RDA (Research Data Alliance) and the European Commission is showing a growing interest in certification services. The success of DSA also provides the challenge to further professionalize the DSA organization in the coming years, this to enable its community to continue to grow.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bloem, J.; Bański, P.; Kupietz, M.; Lüngen, H.; Witt, A.; Barbaresi, A.; Biber, H.; Breiteneder, E.; Clematide, S.;
    Publisher: Institut für Deutsche Sprache
    Country: Netherlands

    This study discusses evaluation methods for linguists to use when employing an automatically annotated treebank as a source of linguistic evidence. While treebanks are usually evaluated with a general measure over all the data, linguistic studies often focus on a particular construction or a group of structures. To judge the quality of linguistic evidence in this case, it would be beneficial to estimate annotation quality over all instances of a particular construction. I discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of four approaches to this type of evaluation: manual evaluation of the results, manual evaluation of the text, falling back to simpler annotation and searching for particular instances of the construction. Furthermore, I illustrate the approaches using an example from Dutch linguistics, two-verb cluster constructions, and estimate precision and recall for this construction on a large automatically annotated treebank of Dutch. From this, I conclude that a combination of approaches on samples from the treebank can be used to estimate the accuracy of the annotation for the construction of interest. This allows researchers to make more definite linguistic claims on the basis of data from automatically annotated treebanks.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jennifer Edmond; Francesca Morselli;
    Publisher: Emerald
    Country: Netherlands

    PurposeThis paper proposes a new perspective on the enormous and unresolved challenge to existing practices of publication and documentation posed by the outputs of digital research projects in the humanities, where much good work is being lost due to resource or technical challenges.Design/methodology/approachThe paper documents and analyses both the existing literature on promoting sustainability for the outputs of digital humanities projects and the innovative approach of a single large-scale project.FindingsThe findings of the research presented show that sustainability planning for large-scale research projects needs to consider data and technology but also community, communications and process knowledge simultaneously. In addition, it should focus not only on a project as a collection of tangible and intangible assets, but also on the potential user base for these assets and what these users consider valuable about them.Research limitations/implicationsThe conclusions of the paper have been formulated in the context of one specific project. As such, it may amplify the specificities of this project in its results.Practical implicationsAn approach to project sustainability following the recommendations outlined in this paper would include a number of uncommon features, such as a longer development horizon, wider perspective on project results, and an audit of tacit and explicit knowledge.Social ImplicationsThese results can ultimately preserve public investment in projects.Originality/valueThis paper supplements more reductive models for project sustainability with a more holistic approach that others may learn from in mapping and sustaining user value for their projects for the medium to long terms.

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Include:
The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
30 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Article . 2017
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; LS Psycholinguistiek; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zeldenrust, D.A.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands

    In this chapter I will describe what the CLARIN infrastructure is and how it can be used, with a focus on the Low Countries (and especially the Netherlands) part of the CLARIN infrastructure. I aim to explain how a Humanities researcher can use the CLARIN infrastructure. I describe the basic functionality that CLARIN aims to offer, including searching for data and software, applying software to data, and storing data and software resulting from research.

  • Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Dillo, I.; De Leeuw, Lisa; de Jong, A.S.M.; van Trier, G.M.; Sieverts, Eric; Koren, Marian;
    Publisher: Vakmedianet
    Country: Netherlands

    If we want to share data, the long-term storage of those data in a trustworthy digital archive is an essential condition. Trust is the basis of storing and sharing data. That trust must be present in the various stakeholders involved. Certification of digital archives can make an important contribution to the confidence of these stakeholders in the digital archives. Ten years ago DANS was assigned the task of developing a Seal of Approval for digital data to ensure that archived data can still be found, understood and used in the future. In 2009 this Data Seal of Approval (DSA) was transferred to an international body, the DSA Board, which has managed and further developed the guidelines and the peer review process ever since. The objectives of the DSA are to safeguard data, ensure high quality and guide reliable management of data for the future without requiring implementation of new standards, regulations or heavy investments. The DSA contains 16 guidelines for applying and verifying quality aspects concerning the creation, storage, use and reuse of digital data. Based on feedback from data archives that applied for a DSA and different case studies we have gained some insight into the benefits of DSA. Still, the impact of having the Seal is not easy to measure. Seal holders usually refer to qualitative benefits in the form of increased awareness of the value of their repositories to their communities, funders and publishers. Ten years down the line we can safely state that the Data Seal of Approval has proven its added value. If we try to look five years into the future, what can we expect? There are different developments: a growing interest in DSA among European research infrastructures, the collaboration between DSA and the ISCU World Data System under the umbrella of the RDA (Research Data Alliance) and the European Commission is showing a growing interest in certification services. The success of DSA also provides the challenge to further professionalize the DSA organization in the coming years, this to enable its community to continue to grow.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bloem, J.; Bański, P.; Kupietz, M.; Lüngen, H.; Witt, A.; Barbaresi, A.; Biber, H.; Breiteneder, E.; Clematide, S.;
    Publisher: Institut für Deutsche Sprache
    Country: Netherlands

    This study discusses evaluation methods for linguists to use when employing an automatically annotated treebank as a source of linguistic evidence. While treebanks are usually evaluated with a general measure over all the data, linguistic studies often focus on a particular construction or a group of structures. To judge the quality of linguistic evidence in this case, it would be beneficial to estimate annotation quality over all instances of a particular construction. I discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of four approaches to this type of evaluation: manual evaluation of the results, manual evaluation of the text, falling back to simpler annotation and searching for particular instances of the construction. Furthermore, I illustrate the approaches using an example from Dutch linguistics, two-verb cluster constructions, and estimate precision and recall for this construction on a large automatically annotated treebank of Dutch. From this, I conclude that a combination of approaches on samples from the treebank can be used to estimate the accuracy of the annotation for the construction of interest. This allows researchers to make more definite linguistic claims on the basis of data from automatically annotated treebanks.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jennifer Edmond; Francesca Morselli;
    Publisher: Emerald
    Country: Netherlands

    PurposeThis paper proposes a new perspective on the enormous and unresolved challenge to existing practices of publication and documentation posed by the outputs of digital research projects in the humanities, where much good work is being lost due to resource or technical challenges.Design/methodology/approachThe paper documents and analyses both the existing literature on promoting sustainability for the outputs of digital humanities projects and the innovative approach of a single large-scale project.FindingsThe findings of the research presented show that sustainability planning for large-scale research projects needs to consider data and technology but also community, communications and process knowledge simultaneously. In addition, it should focus not only on a project as a collection of tangible and intangible assets, but also on the potential user base for these assets and what these users consider valuable about them.Research limitations/implicationsThe conclusions of the paper have been formulated in the context of one specific project. As such, it may amplify the specificities of this project in its results.Practical implicationsAn approach to project sustainability following the recommendations outlined in this paper would include a number of uncommon features, such as a longer development horizon, wider perspective on project results, and an audit of tacit and explicit knowledge.Social ImplicationsThese results can ultimately preserve public investment in projects.Originality/valueThis paper supplements more reductive models for project sustainability with a more holistic approach that others may learn from in mapping and sustaining user value for their projects for the medium to long terms.