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37 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2013-2022
  • English
  • NARCIS
  • DARIAH EU

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nispen, van, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247), EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanden Daelen, Veerle; Drenth, Petra;
    Project: EC | EHRI (654164)

    International audience; The mission of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) is to support the Holocaust research community by building a digital infrastructure and facilitating human networks. EHRI provides online access to information about dispersed sources relating to the Holocaust through its Online Portal, and tools and methods that enable researchers and archivists to collaboratively work with such sources. Apart from providing an online platform, EHRI also facilitates an extensive network of researchers, archivists and others to increase cohesion and co-ordination among practitioners and to initiate new transnational and collaborative approaches to the study of the Holocaust. EHRI thereby seeks to overcome one of the hallmark challenges of Holocaust research: the wide dispersal of the archival source material across Europe and beyond, and the concomitant fragmentation of Holocaust historiography. More than twenty organisations – research institutions, libraries, archives, museums and memorial sites – from 17 countries form a core working group, but EHRI equally relies on the support of many other individuals and organisations in the broad fields of Holocaust studies and digital humanities. With a poster presentation at the DARIAH-EU Annual Event 2017 in Berlin, the authors would like to present the resources and services EHRI has to offer to the research community, with a special emphasis on the EHRI Portal. The EHRI portal offers access to information on Holocaust-related archival material held in institutions across Europe and beyond. You can browse 57 country reports, 1,938 archival institutions in 51 countries, and 231,478 archival descriptions in 472 institutions (April 2017). Other EHRI resources and training include: Online Training in Holocaust Studies; Seminars and Workshops; Fellowship Programme; Conferences; Online Document Blog; Online Research Guides; and Tools and Methods for Digital History. Two features were highlighted: The relatively new EHRI Document Blog, and the successful EHRI Fellowships. The EHRI Document Blog is a space to share ideas about Holocaust-related archival documents, and their presentation and interpretation, using digital tools. The EHRI Fellowships support and stimulate Holocaust research by facilitating international access to key archives and collections as well as archival and digital humanities knowhow. The fellowships intend to support researchers, archivists, curators, and younger scholars. By bringing together experts from different fields, and by building an innovative digital infrastructure supported by a large community, EHRI is a flagship project that showcases the opportunities for historical research in the digital age. EHRI started its work in October 2010 with initial financial support from the European Union for four years. Thanks to the continued EU support, EHRI keeps on developing. EHRI is devoted to building a Holocaust research infrastructure that is sustained by its network and will have a right of existence on its own accord.https://portal.ehri-project.eu/www.ehri-project.eu

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, A.Th.; Witkamp, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wijnant, Arnaud; Kvamme, Trond; Kvalheim, Vigdis; Recker, Astrid; Fihn, Johan; Berglund, Torbjörn; Jerlehag, Birger; +7 more
    Publisher: University of Copenhagen
    Project: EC | DASISH (283646)

    This report was produced in the context of the project Data Service Infrastructure for the Social Sciences and Humanities (DASISH) work package 4.3 Convergence of Data Services. The goal has been to allow the selection and promotion of high-quality deposit services for researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) and to make suggestions for service improvements.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Buddenbohm, Stefan; Cretin, Nathanael; Dijk, E.M.S.; Gaiffe, Bertrand; De Jong, M.A.; Le Tellier-Becquart, Nathalie; Minel, Jean-Luc;
    Publisher: DARIAH
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    Publishing research data as open data is not yet common practice for researchers in the arts and humanities, and lags behind other scientific fields, such as the natural sciences. Moreover, even when humanities researchers publish their data in repositories and archives, these data are often hard to find and use by other researchers in the field. This report gives an overview of the various aspects that are connected to open access publishing of research data in the humanities. After the introduction, where we give definitions of key concepts, we describe the research data life cycle. We present an overview of the different stakeholders involved and we look into advantages and obstacles for researchers to share research data. Furthermore, a description of the European data repositories is given, followed by certification standards of trusted digital data repositories. The possibility of data citation is important for sharing open data and is also described in this report. We also discuss the standards and use of metadata in the humanities. Finally, we discuss best practice example of open access research data system in the humanities: the French open research data ecosystem. With this report we provide information and guidance on open access publishing of humanities research data for researchers. It will also serve as input for the design and implementation of an open humanities data platform in DARIAH.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davide Salomoni; Isabel Campos; Luciano Gaido; J. Marco de Lucas; P. Solagna; Jorge Gomes; Luděk Matyska; P. Fuhrman; Marcus Hardt; Giacinto Donvito; +43 more
    Countries: Italy, Netherlands, Netherlands, Spain, Croatia, Italy, Germany, Croatia, Italy, Croatia ...
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EOSC-hub (777536)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. INDIGO-Datacloud has been funded by the European Commision H2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement RIA 653549. Peer reviewed