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38 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2013-2022
  • Open Access
  • English
  • NARCIS
  • DARIAH EU

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zeldenrust, D.A.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands

    In this chapter I will describe what the CLARIN infrastructure is and how it can be used, with a focus on the Low Countries (and especially the Netherlands) part of the CLARIN infrastructure. I aim to explain how a Humanities researcher can use the CLARIN infrastructure. I describe the basic functionality that CLARIN aims to offer, including searching for data and software, applying software to data, and storing data and software resulting from research.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, A.Th.; Witkamp, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wijnant, Arnaud; Kvamme, Trond; Kvalheim, Vigdis; Recker, Astrid; Fihn, Johan; Berglund, Torbjörn; Jerlehag, Birger; +7 more
    Publisher: University of Copenhagen
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | DASISH (283646)

    This report was produced in the context of the project Data Service Infrastructure for the Social Sciences and Humanities (DASISH) work package 4.3 Convergence of Data Services. The goal has been to allow the selection and promotion of high-quality deposit services for researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) and to make suggestions for service improvements.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Buddenbohm, Stefan; Cretin, Nathanael; Dijk, E.M.S.; Gaiffe, Bertrand; De Jong, M.A.; Le Tellier-Becquart, Nathalie; Minel, Jean-Luc;
    Publisher: DARIAH
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    Publishing research data as open data is not yet common practice for researchers in the arts and humanities, and lags behind other scientific fields, such as the natural sciences. Moreover, even when humanities researchers publish their data in repositories and archives, these data are often hard to find and use by other researchers in the field. This report gives an overview of the various aspects that are connected to open access publishing of research data in the humanities. After the introduction, where we give definitions of key concepts, we describe the research data life cycle. We present an overview of the different stakeholders involved and we look into advantages and obstacles for researchers to share research data. Furthermore, a description of the European data repositories is given, followed by certification standards of trusted digital data repositories. The possibility of data citation is important for sharing open data and is also described in this report. We also discuss the standards and use of metadata in the humanities. Finally, we discuss best practice example of open access research data system in the humanities: the French open research data ecosystem. With this report we provide information and guidance on open access publishing of humanities research data for researchers. It will also serve as input for the design and implementation of an open humanities data platform in DARIAH.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bloem, J.; Bański, P.; Kupietz, M.; Lüngen, H.; Witt, A.; Barbaresi, A.; Biber, H.; Breiteneder, E.; Clematide, S.;
    Publisher: Institut für Deutsche Sprache
    Country: Netherlands

    This study discusses evaluation methods for linguists to use when employing an automatically annotated treebank as a source of linguistic evidence. While treebanks are usually evaluated with a general measure over all the data, linguistic studies often focus on a particular construction or a group of structures. To judge the quality of linguistic evidence in this case, it would be beneficial to estimate annotation quality over all instances of a particular construction. I discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of four approaches to this type of evaluation: manual evaluation of the results, manual evaluation of the text, falling back to simpler annotation and searching for particular instances of the construction. Furthermore, I illustrate the approaches using an example from Dutch linguistics, two-verb cluster constructions, and estimate precision and recall for this construction on a large automatically annotated treebank of Dutch. From this, I conclude that a combination of approaches on samples from the treebank can be used to estimate the accuracy of the annotation for the construction of interest. This allows researchers to make more definite linguistic claims on the basis of data from automatically annotated treebanks.

search
Include:
The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
38 Research products, page 1 of 4
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zeldenrust, D.A.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Odijk, Jan; Odijk, Jan; Hessen, Arjan van; LS OZ Taal en spraaktechnologie; UiL OTS LLI;
    Country: Netherlands

    In this chapter I will describe what the CLARIN infrastructure is and how it can be used, with a focus on the Low Countries (and especially the Netherlands) part of the CLARIN infrastructure. I aim to explain how a Humanities researcher can use the CLARIN infrastructure. I describe the basic functionality that CLARIN aims to offer, including searching for data and software, applying software to data, and storing data and software resulting from research.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, A.Th.; Witkamp, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wijnant, Arnaud; Kvamme, Trond; Kvalheim, Vigdis; Recker, Astrid; Fihn, Johan; Berglund, Torbjörn; Jerlehag, Birger; +7 more
    Publisher: University of Copenhagen
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | DASISH (283646)

    This report was produced in the context of the project Data Service Infrastructure for the Social Sciences and Humanities (DASISH) work package 4.3 Convergence of Data Services. The goal has been to allow the selection and promotion of high-quality deposit services for researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) and to make suggestions for service improvements.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Buddenbohm, Stefan; Cretin, Nathanael; Dijk, E.M.S.; Gaiffe, Bertrand; De Jong, M.A.; Le Tellier-Becquart, Nathalie; Minel, Jean-Luc;
    Publisher: DARIAH
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    Publishing research data as open data is not yet common practice for researchers in the arts and humanities, and lags behind other scientific fields, such as the natural sciences. Moreover, even when humanities researchers publish their data in repositories and archives, these data are often hard to find and use by other researchers in the field. This report gives an overview of the various aspects that are connected to open access publishing of research data in the humanities. After the introduction, where we give definitions of key concepts, we describe the research data life cycle. We present an overview of the different stakeholders involved and we look into advantages and obstacles for researchers to share research data. Furthermore, a description of the European data repositories is given, followed by certification standards of trusted digital data repositories. The possibility of data citation is important for sharing open data and is also described in this report. We also discuss the standards and use of metadata in the humanities. Finally, we discuss best practice example of open access research data system in the humanities: the French open research data ecosystem. With this report we provide information and guidance on open access publishing of humanities research data for researchers. It will also serve as input for the design and implementation of an open humanities data platform in DARIAH.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bloem, J.; Bański, P.; Kupietz, M.; Lüngen, H.; Witt, A.; Barbaresi, A.; Biber, H.; Breiteneder, E.; Clematide, S.;
    Publisher: Institut für Deutsche Sprache
    Country: Netherlands

    This study discusses evaluation methods for linguists to use when employing an automatically annotated treebank as a source of linguistic evidence. While treebanks are usually evaluated with a general measure over all the data, linguistic studies often focus on a particular construction or a group of structures. To judge the quality of linguistic evidence in this case, it would be beneficial to estimate annotation quality over all instances of a particular construction. I discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of four approaches to this type of evaluation: manual evaluation of the results, manual evaluation of the text, falling back to simpler annotation and searching for particular instances of the construction. Furthermore, I illustrate the approaches using an example from Dutch linguistics, two-verb cluster constructions, and estimate precision and recall for this construction on a large automatically annotated treebank of Dutch. From this, I conclude that a combination of approaches on samples from the treebank can be used to estimate the accuracy of the annotation for the construction of interest. This allows researchers to make more definite linguistic claims on the basis of data from automatically annotated treebanks.