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12 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2017-2021
  • Open Access
  • Conference object
  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société
  • Archive ouverte UNIGE
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamé, M.; Pittet, P.; Federico Ponchio; Markhoff, B.; Sanfilippo, E. M.;
    Countries: France, Italy

    International audience; In this paper, we present an online communication-driven decision support system to align terms from a dataset with terms of another dataset (standardized controlled vocabulary or not). Heterotoki differs from existing proposals in that it takes place at the interface with humans, inviting the experts to commit on their definitions, so as to either agree to validate the mapping or to propose some enrichment to the terminologies. More precisely, differently to most of existing proposals that support terminology alignment, Heterotoki sustains the negotiation of meaning thanks to semantic coordination support within its interface design. This negotiation involves domain experts having produced multiple datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • Publication . Presentation . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access

    Slides presented at the EADH conference in Galway, 09.12.2018. OpenMethods (https://openmethods.dariah.eu) is a metablog aimed at republishing and bringing together all sorts of Open Access publications (e.g. research articles, preprints, blogs, videos, podcasts) about Digital Humanities methods and tools to spread the knowledge and raise peer recognition for them. The has been developed in the supervision of the DARIAH community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumouchel, Suzanne;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; This contribution will show how Access play a strong role in the creation and structuring of DARIAH, a European Digital Research Infrastructure in Arts and Humanities.To achieve this goal, this contribution will develop the concept of Access from five examples:_ Interdisciplinarity point of view_ Manage contradiction between national and international perspectives_ Involve different communities (not only researchers stakeholders)_ Manage tools and services_ Develop and use new collaboration toolsWe would like to demonstrate that speaking about Access always implies a selection, a choice, even in the perspective of "Open Access".

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Joke Daems; Sally Chambers; Zere, Tecle; Christophe Verbruggen;
    Countries: Belgium, France

    International audience; The digital text platform is part of the Flemish contribution to DARIAH Belgium (DARIAH = Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities). The goal is to create a platform for the collaborative management and discovery of digitised textual collections that allows digital humanities researchers to prepare their corpora (consisting of, for example, digitised newspapers and books) for textual analysis. The platform will enable researchers to browse and search the digitised collections compiled, cleaned, enriched and managed by the researchers themselves. Once the relevant research sub-corpus has been compiled, data export tools, using standardised open formats (such as XML, JSON, .csv, .txt, etc.) will enable researchers to export sub-corpus for analysis with existing digital text analysis tools such as MALLET, (http://mallet.cs.umass.edu/topics.php) for topic modelling, VOYANT (http://voyant-tools.org) for data visualisation or AntConC (http://www.laurenceanthony.net/software/antconc/) for concordance and textual analysis.The platform has been conceived as part of a larger and modular virtual research environment service infrastructure (http://www.ghentcdh.ugent.be/projects/dariah-vl_vre.si). In a previous phase, possible frameworks and content management systems were tested, notably Islandora (a digital asset management system based on Fedora Commons and Drupal), but also Mediawiki and Omeka.One of the main challenges of the envisaged new platform is the possibility to integrate a wider variety of possible textual data streams (including a scan workflow). In addition, user-friendliness, scalability, adherence to standards and facilitating the interoperability of data are key issues to be addressed. The platform will build on the existing IIIF format, the International Image Interoperability Framework. This format is used by some of the most important libraries and cultural heritage institutions in the world, therefore providing access to enormous collections of digital objects. As the name suggests, IIIF is mainly focused on displaying and annotating images. However, we fully endorse the IIIF-community’s vision to develop an overarching interoperability framework for other data types, including all kinds of textual data. Benefits of the format include the interoperability, the ease of sharing images and annotations without the need to exchange files, and its support for multilingual data. In the months leading up to the conference, we will evaluate the existing IIIFpowered digital libraries and research projects and how they deal with practices of co-creation, data cleaning and enrichment of (structural) metadata. OCR improvement will become vital, as digital textual analysis can only be performed well on high-quality textual data. A related challenge will be combining the various input formats and converting them to different output formats required for analysis. In our poster, we will present a summary of our experiences with and technical assessment of our previous Islandora installation, in addition to our survey of the existing corpus management solutions. As a way of conclusion, we will introduce the envisioned new version of the platform.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elisa Nury;
    Country: Switzerland

    International audience; This paper describes the workflow of the Grammateus project, from gathering data on Greek documentary papyri to the creation of a web application. The first stage is the selection of a corpus and the choice of metadata to record: papyrology specialists gather data from printed editions, existing online resources and digital facsimiles. In the next step, this data is transformed into the EpiDoc standard of XML TEI encoding, to facilitate its reuse by others, and processed for HTML display. We also reuse existing text transcriptions available on . Since these transcriptions may be regularly updated by the scholarly community, we aim to access them dynamically. Although the transcriptions follow the EpiDoc guidelines, the wide diversity of the papyri as well as small inconsistencies in encoding make data reuse challenging. Currently, our data is available on an institutional GitLab repository, and we will archive our final dataset according to the FAIR principles.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wilms, Lotte; Cock, Michiel; Companjen, Ben;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience; Academic libraries in the Netherlands have the ambition to increase the knowledge level of their librarians on digital humanities (DH). Three libraries therefore set up a series of full-day training events aimed specifically at library professionals of academic and research libraries in the Netherlands, named DH Clinics. The aim of these clinics is to provide basic methodological competencies and technical skills in DH, for a diverse group of library employees, consisting of both subject and technical librarians with basic technical skills. The content of these sessions should 1) enable them to provide services to researchers and students, 2) identify remaining gaps in knowledge or skills that they could address by self-directed learning and 3) (possibly) to automate their daily library work. This paper describes final schedule of the DH Clinics, how we organised the design process by involving the user community and the lessons we learned.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrea C. Bertino; Luca Foppiano; Laurent Romary; Pierre Mounier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HIRMEOS (731102), EC | HIRMEOS (731102)

    This paper addresses the integration of a Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation (NERD) service within a group of open access (OA) publishing digital platforms and considers its potential impact on both research and scholarly publishing. The software powering this service, called entity-fishing, was initially developed by Inria in the context of the EU FP7 project CENDARI and provides automatic entity recognition and disambiguation using the Wikipedia and Wikidata data sets. The application is distributed with an open-source licence, and it has been deployed as a web service in DARIAH's infrastructure hosted by the French HumaNum. In the paper, we focus on the specific issues related to its integration on five OA platforms specialized in the publication of scholarly monographs in the social sciences and humanities (SSH), as part of the work carried out within the EU H2020 project HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure). In the first section, we give a brief overview of the current status and evolution of OA publications, considering specifically the challenges that OA monographs are encountering. In the second part, we show how the HIRMEOS project aims to face these challenges by optimizing five OA digital platforms for the publication of monographs from the SSH and ensuring their interoperability. In sections three and four we give a comprehensive description of the entity-fishing service, focusing on its concrete applications in real use cases together with some further possible ideas on how to exploit the annotations generated. We show that entity-fishing annotations can improve both research and publishing process. In the last chapter, we briefly present further possible application scenarios that could be made available through infrastructural projects.

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Anne Baillot;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Die These, die hier vertreten wird, verortet die Bekehrungsmanöver in einer diametral entgegengesetzten Glaubensgemeinschaft: Eine Religion der Big Data gibt es wohl, und eines ihrer Evangelien nennt sich Netzwerkvisualisierung. Ohne Netzwerk geht nichts, alles ist Netzwerk. Sicherlich machen es zum einen die Datenflut und zum anderen die Verknüpfungen zwischen ebendiesen Daten nötig, sich Orientierung zu verschaffen. Im Zuge dessen wurde der Ideen- und Literaturgeschichte der Rekurs auf Netzwerkanalyse aufgebürdet. Das Kreuz, das es zu schleppen gilt, ist eben das Netzwerk. Aber liefern Netzwerke und ihre Visualisierungen wirklich die Orientierung, die die Geisteswissenschaften brauchen? Wozu sind Netzwerke für die Literaturwissenschaft gut? Was erlauben sie uns zu machen, was wir anders nicht bewerkstelligen könnten?Ansätze zur Beantwortung dieser Fragen werden in drei Schritten vorgestellt. Zunächst werde ich basal mit der Frage „Was ist ein Netzwerk?“ beginnen. Dabei geht es mir darum zu umreißen, was ein „gutes“ Netzwerk ausmacht, d.h. ein Netzwerk, aus dem man aus literaturwissenschaftlicher Sicht sinnvolle Informationen gewinnen kann. Im zweiten Teil stelle ich digitale Briefeditionen vor (im Speziellen meine eigene) und was diese an Anknüpfungspunkten für Netzmodelle bieten. In einem dritten Teil gehe ich schließlich auf die Einbettung von Netzmodellen in die konkrete Textarbeit ein.