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24 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2017-2021
  • Conference object
  • English
  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Publication . Conference object . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Marlet , Olivier; Francart, Thomas; Markhoff, Béatrice; Rodier, Xavier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    International audience; CIDOC CRM is an ontology intended to facilitate the integration, mediation and interchange of heterogeneous cultural heritage information. The Semantic Web with its Linked Open Data cloud enables scholars and cultural institutions to publish their data in RDF, using CIDOC CRM as an interlingua that enables a semantically consistent re-interpretation of their data. Nowadays more and more projects have done the task of mapping legacy datasets to CIDOC CRM, and successful Extract-Transform-Load data-integration processes have been performed in this way. A next step is enabling people and applications to actually dynamically explore autonomous datasets using the semantic mediation offered by CIDOC CRM. This is the purpose of OpenArchaeo, a tool for querying archaeological datasets on the LOD cloud. We present its main features: the principles behind its user friendly query interface and its SPARQL Endpoint for programs, together with its overall architecture designed to be extendable and scalable, for handling transparent interconnections with evolving distributed sources while achieving good efficiency.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Chambers, Sally; Deroo, Katrien; Wout, Dillen; Dozo, Björn-Olav; Gheldof, Tom; Kestemont, Mike;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Digital Humanities is thriving in Belgium. As a Founding Member of DARIAH-EU, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, our aim is to offer a sustainable portfolio of services enabling digital scholarship in the arts and humanities. To realise this DARIAH partner institutions are encouraged to establish Digital Humanities Research Centres which together form a humanities-specific digital ecosystem, offering services both within their own institutions and to other institutions in Belgium and beyond. This poster presents four DH centres in Belgium: three existing centres; the Centre Informatique de Philosophie et Lettres (CIPL, Université de Liège), the University of Antwerp’s Platform for Digital Humanities (platform{DH}, UA) and the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities (GhentCDH, Ghent University) plus the Leuven Centre for Digital Humanities (LCDH, KU Leuven) which is currently being established. Finally, we share our experiences and lessons learned from establishing digital humanities centres in our own institutions and interconnecting them via the DARIAH network.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumouchel, Suzanne;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; This contribution will show how Access play a strong role in the creation and structuring of DARIAH, a European Digital Research Infrastructure in Arts and Humanities.To achieve this goal, this contribution will develop the concept of Access from five examples:_ Interdisciplinarity point of view_ Manage contradiction between national and international perspectives_ Involve different communities (not only researchers stakeholders)_ Manage tools and services_ Develop and use new collaboration toolsWe would like to demonstrate that speaking about Access always implies a selection, a choice, even in the perspective of "Open Access".

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    English
    Authors: 
    Demonet, Marie-Luce;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    International audience; Once upon a time, the preservation, the study, and the digitization of books were primarily justified by utilitarian needs: to obtain a qualification, or to hold down a job — or to share ideas, or to satisfy a hedonistic need derived from the pleasure of reading. Nowadays the building of corpora and the digitization of collections could replace books by « data », the consultation of which threatens a close engagement with the linearity of text. I will comment on examples chosen from the library of Le Mans, and from my own collection, to question this apparent under valuing of reading in favour of results derived by means of tools only partly under human control.; La conservation, l’étude et la numérisation des livres ont été avant tout justifiées par un besoin social ou individuel de lecture : utilitaire, pour obtenir un diplôme et avoir un métier, pour diffuser des idées, besoin hédoniste issu du plaisir de la lecture. Actuellement la constitution des corpus et la numérisation de collections pourraient remplacer les livres par les « données », dont la consultation mettrait en danger un rapport au texte qui était avant tout « linéaire ». Des exemples pris dans les fonds de la bibliothèque du Mans ou personnels permettent d’alimenter le débat autour de ce qui apparaît comme une déqualification de la lecture, au profit de résultats obtenus grâce à un outillage plus ou moins bien maîtrisé par l’humain.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2018
    English
    Authors: 
    Gheldof, Tom; Pietowski, Frédéric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; Trismegistos [http://www.trismegistos.org; abbreviated as TM], is an interdisciplinary platform covering metadata about texts from the Ancient World (800 BC - AD 800). Its database currently contains information about provenance, dating and the archival context, geographic and prosopographical attestations in these texts and references to both classical authors and modern editors. All of this information (and more) is openly accessible for all of our users on the TM website.Now TM is expanding its role as data curator and service provider with the launch of the new Data Services portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices), currently focused on the metadata about TM Texts and Places (https://www.trismegistos.org/geo). By using the digital tools such as the TM APIs, web applications can be enriched with validated linked open data from the TM database. The provided endpoints can be used in combination with other web services to create interactive, feature-rich content due to the light-weight, customizable JSON-responses.By calling the endpoint with a valid Trismegistos Geo ID (e.g., Alexandria = TM Geo 100; http://www.trismegistos.org/place/100), users can download a JSON file or directly parse the content of the call in GeoJSON format. This ID can also be used to retrieve URIs linking to more information about a TM Place via the GeoRelations portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices/georelations/documentation), providing a total of over 33,000 indexed URIs from 19 partner websites. The TexRelations portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices/texrelations/documentation) similarly offers information on the textual level, by offering JSON, XML or JSON-URI based responses. This endpoint successfully links over 1 million online resources from 79 partner websites. The lightweight responses can be used by anyone, using tools such as FileMaker, POSTMAN, Python scripts or customizable JavaScript solutions.By providing reliable and easy-to-use endpoints TM wants to provide stable IDs to existing projects and help researchers by pointing them towards other resources of scientific knowledge. In doing so, hopefully more links from new partners will be added to the different TM portals (such as TM Texts and Places) and linked to a TM ID, creating a carefully curated network of Ancient World Linked Open Data.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raciti, Marco; Gabay, Simon; Moranville, Yoann; Jorge, Maria do Rosário; Fernandes, João;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    International audience; Europe has a long and rich tradition as a centre of research and teaching in the arts and humanities. However, the huge digital transformation that affects the arts and humanities research landscape all over the world requires that we set up sustainable research infrastructures, new and refined techniques, state-of-the-art methods and an expanded skills base. Responding to these challenges, the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) was launched as a pan-European network and research infrastructure. After expansion and consolidation, which involved DARIAH’s inclusion in the ESFRI roadmap, DARIAH became a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) in 2014. The Horizon 2020 funded project DESIR (DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined) sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and help establish it as a reliable long-term partner within our communities. Sustaining existing digital expertise, tools, resources in Europe in the context of DESIR involves a goal-oriented set of measures in order to first, maintain, expand and develop DARIAH in its capacities as an organisation and technical research infrastructure; secondly, to engage its members further, as well as measure and increase their trust in DARIAH; thirdly, to expand the network in order to integrate new regions and communities. The DESIR consortium is composed of core DARIAH members, representatives from potential new DARIAH members and external technical experts. The sustainability of a research infrastructure is the capacity to remain operative, effective and competitive over its expected lifetime. In DESIR, this definition is translated into an evolving 6-dimensional process, divided into the following challenges:•Dissemination•Growth•Technology•Robustness•Trust•EducationWith our poster, we would like to show how the project helps sustaining DARIAH. Within DESIR, dissemination is the ability to communicate DARIAH’s strategy and benefits effectively within the DARIAH community and in new areas, spreading out to new communities. Through the international workshops held at Stanford University and at the Library of Congress, DARIAH has been introduced to many non-European DH scholars. These events were an important first step to foster international cooperation between US and European colleagues as well as a catalyst for ongoing collaborations in the future. A third workshop took place in Canberra at the Australian Research Data Commons in March 2019.DARIAH has currently 17 members from all over Europe. Nevertheless, efforts should be made to include as many countries as possible to bring in and scale, to a European level, even more state-of-the-art DH activities.Six candidates ready for building strong national consortia have been identified, enabling a substantial expansion of DARIAH’s country coverage. Additionally, thematic workshops are organised in each country as well as tailored training measures.DESIR widens the research infrastructure in core areas which are vital for DARIAH’s sustainability but are not yet covered by the existing set-up. As DARIAH expands across Europe, continuously enhancing and further developing the ERIC exceeds DARIAH’s internal technological capacities. Two notable results were achieved so far: firstly, the publication of a technical reference as a result of a workshop organised in October 2017 with CESSDA and CLARIN. It’s a collection of basic guidelines and references for development and maintenance of infrastructure services within DARIAH and beyond, addressing an ongoing issue for research infrastructures, namely software sustainability. Secondly, the organisation of a Code Sprint, focusing on bibliographical and citation metadata, which helped shaping DARIAH’s profile in four technology areas (visualisation, text analytic services, entity-based search and scholarly content management). Another Code sprint is expected to take place in Summer 2019.Another output is the implementation of a centralized helpdesk. This helpdesk is hosted by CLARIN-D and the solution of integration within the existing DARIAH website was the creation of a WordPress plugin. This plugin is used to connect our website with the OTRS server and allows the creation of issues easily by users unfamiliar with OTRS.Sustaining a research infrastructure involves also two important aspects: trust and education. For DARIAH, it is crucial to increase trust and confidence from its users. In DESIR we develop recommendations and strategies accordingly, targeting new cross-disciplinary communities, based on the results of a survey and interviews addressed to the scientific community, with different levels of approach - national, institutional and individual.In addition, education is a key area and the project contributes to the ongoing discussions about the role and modalities of training and education in the development, consolidation and sustainability of digital research infrastructures. We believe that investing time and efforts into training and educating users is a way of securing the social sustainability of a research infrastructure.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wilms, Lotte; Cock, Michiel; Companjen, Ben;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience; Academic libraries in the Netherlands have the ambition to increase the knowledge level of their librarians on digital humanities (DH). Three libraries therefore set up a series of full-day training events aimed specifically at library professionals of academic and research libraries in the Netherlands, named DH Clinics. The aim of these clinics is to provide basic methodological competencies and technical skills in DH, for a diverse group of library employees, consisting of both subject and technical librarians with basic technical skills. The content of these sessions should 1) enable them to provide services to researchers and students, 2) identify remaining gaps in knowledge or skills that they could address by self-directed learning and 3) (possibly) to automate their daily library work. This paper describes final schedule of the DH Clinics, how we organised the design process by involving the user community and the lessons we learned.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Khemakhem, Mohamed; Herold, Axel; Romary, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    International audience; The last decade has seen a rapid development of the number of NLP tools which have been made available to the community. The usability of several e-lexicography tools represents a serious obstacle for researchers with little or no background in computer science. We present in this paper our efforts to overcome this issue in the case of a machine learning system for the automatic segmentation and semantic annotation of digitised dictionaries. Our approach is based on limiting the burdens of managing the tool's setup in different execution environments and lightening the complexity of the training process. We illustrate the possibility to reach this goal through the adaptation of existing functionalities and through using out of the box software deployment technology. We also report on the community's feedback after exposing the new setup to real users of different professional backgrounds.

search
Include:
The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
24 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Publication . Conference object . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Marlet , Olivier; Francart, Thomas; Markhoff, Béatrice; Rodier, Xavier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    International audience; CIDOC CRM is an ontology intended to facilitate the integration, mediation and interchange of heterogeneous cultural heritage information. The Semantic Web with its Linked Open Data cloud enables scholars and cultural institutions to publish their data in RDF, using CIDOC CRM as an interlingua that enables a semantically consistent re-interpretation of their data. Nowadays more and more projects have done the task of mapping legacy datasets to CIDOC CRM, and successful Extract-Transform-Load data-integration processes have been performed in this way. A next step is enabling people and applications to actually dynamically explore autonomous datasets using the semantic mediation offered by CIDOC CRM. This is the purpose of OpenArchaeo, a tool for querying archaeological datasets on the LOD cloud. We present its main features: the principles behind its user friendly query interface and its SPARQL Endpoint for programs, together with its overall architecture designed to be extendable and scalable, for handling transparent interconnections with evolving distributed sources while achieving good efficiency.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Chambers, Sally; Deroo, Katrien; Wout, Dillen; Dozo, Björn-Olav; Gheldof, Tom; Kestemont, Mike;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Digital Humanities is thriving in Belgium. As a Founding Member of DARIAH-EU, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, our aim is to offer a sustainable portfolio of services enabling digital scholarship in the arts and humanities. To realise this DARIAH partner institutions are encouraged to establish Digital Humanities Research Centres which together form a humanities-specific digital ecosystem, offering services both within their own institutions and to other institutions in Belgium and beyond. This poster presents four DH centres in Belgium: three existing centres; the Centre Informatique de Philosophie et Lettres (CIPL, Université de Liège), the University of Antwerp’s Platform for Digital Humanities (platform{DH}, UA) and the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities (GhentCDH, Ghent University) plus the Leuven Centre for Digital Humanities (LCDH, KU Leuven) which is currently being established. Finally, we share our experiences and lessons learned from establishing digital humanities centres in our own institutions and interconnecting them via the DARIAH network.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumouchel, Suzanne;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; This contribution will show how Access play a strong role in the creation and structuring of DARIAH, a European Digital Research Infrastructure in Arts and Humanities.To achieve this goal, this contribution will develop the concept of Access from five examples:_ Interdisciplinarity point of view_ Manage contradiction between national and international perspectives_ Involve different communities (not only researchers stakeholders)_ Manage tools and services_ Develop and use new collaboration toolsWe would like to demonstrate that speaking about Access always implies a selection, a choice, even in the perspective of "Open Access".

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    English
    Authors: 
    Demonet, Marie-Luce;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    International audience; Once upon a time, the preservation, the study, and the digitization of books were primarily justified by utilitarian needs: to obtain a qualification, or to hold down a job — or to share ideas, or to satisfy a hedonistic need derived from the pleasure of reading. Nowadays the building of corpora and the digitization of collections could replace books by « data », the consultation of which threatens a close engagement with the linearity of text. I will comment on examples chosen from the library of Le Mans, and from my own collection, to question this apparent under valuing of reading in favour of results derived by means of tools only partly under human control.; La conservation, l’étude et la numérisation des livres ont été avant tout justifiées par un besoin social ou individuel de lecture : utilitaire, pour obtenir un diplôme et avoir un métier, pour diffuser des idées, besoin hédoniste issu du plaisir de la lecture. Actuellement la constitution des corpus et la numérisation de collections pourraient remplacer les livres par les « données », dont la consultation mettrait en danger un rapport au texte qui était avant tout « linéaire ». Des exemples pris dans les fonds de la bibliothèque du Mans ou personnels permettent d’alimenter le débat autour de ce qui apparaît comme une déqualification de la lecture, au profit de résultats obtenus grâce à un outillage plus ou moins bien maîtrisé par l’humain.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2018
    English
    Authors: 
    Gheldof, Tom; Pietowski, Frédéric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; Trismegistos [http://www.trismegistos.org; abbreviated as TM], is an interdisciplinary platform covering metadata about texts from the Ancient World (800 BC - AD 800). Its database currently contains information about provenance, dating and the archival context, geographic and prosopographical attestations in these texts and references to both classical authors and modern editors. All of this information (and more) is openly accessible for all of our users on the TM website.Now TM is expanding its role as data curator and service provider with the launch of the new Data Services portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices), currently focused on the metadata about TM Texts and Places (https://www.trismegistos.org/geo). By using the digital tools such as the TM APIs, web applications can be enriched with validated linked open data from the TM database. The provided endpoints can be used in combination with other web services to create interactive, feature-rich content due to the light-weight, customizable JSON-responses.By calling the endpoint with a valid Trismegistos Geo ID (e.g., Alexandria = TM Geo 100; http://www.trismegistos.org/place/100), users can download a JSON file or directly parse the content of the call in GeoJSON format. This ID can also be used to retrieve URIs linking to more information about a TM Place via the GeoRelations portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices/georelations/documentation), providing a total of over 33,000 indexed URIs from 19 partner websites. The TexRelations portal (https://www.trismegistos.org/dataservices/texrelations/documentation) similarly offers information on the textual level, by offering JSON, XML or JSON-URI based responses. This endpoint successfully links over 1 million online resources from 79 partner websites. The lightweight responses can be used by anyone, using tools such as FileMaker, POSTMAN, Python scripts or customizable JavaScript solutions.By providing reliable and easy-to-use endpoints TM wants to provide stable IDs to existing projects and help researchers by pointing them towards other resources of scientific knowledge. In doing so, hopefully more links from new partners will be added to the different TM portals (such as TM Texts and Places) and linked to a TM ID, creating a carefully curated network of Ancient World Linked Open Data.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raciti, Marco; Gabay, Simon; Moranville, Yoann; Jorge, Maria do Rosário; Fernandes, João;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    International audience; Europe has a long and rich tradition as a centre of research and teaching in the arts and humanities. However, the huge digital transformation that affects the arts and humanities research landscape all over the world requires that we set up sustainable research infrastructures, new and refined techniques, state-of-the-art methods and an expanded skills base. Responding to these challenges, the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) was launched as a pan-European network and research infrastructure. After expansion and consolidation, which involved DARIAH’s inclusion in the ESFRI roadmap, DARIAH became a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) in 2014. The Horizon 2020 funded project DESIR (DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined) sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and help establish it as a reliable long-term partner within our communities. Sustaining existing digital expertise, tools, resources in Europe in the context of DESIR involves a goal-oriented set of measures in order to first, maintain, expand and develop DARIAH in its capacities as an organisation and technical research infrastructure; secondly, to engage its members further, as well as measure and increase their trust in DARIAH; thirdly, to expand the network in order to integrate new regions and communities. The DESIR consortium is composed of core DARIAH members, representatives from potential new DARIAH members and external technical experts. The sustainability of a research infrastructure is the capacity to remain operative, effective and competitive over its expected lifetime. In DESIR, this definition is translated into an evolving 6-dimensional process, divided into the following challenges:•Dissemination•Growth•Technology•Robustness•Trust•EducationWith our poster, we would like to show how the project helps sustaining DARIAH. Within DESIR, dissemination is the ability to communicate DARIAH’s strategy and benefits effectively within the DARIAH community and in new areas, spreading out to new communities. Through the international workshops held at Stanford University and at the Library of Congress, DARIAH has been introduced to many non-European DH scholars. These events were an important first step to foster international cooperation between US and European colleagues as well as a catalyst for ongoing collaborations in the future. A third workshop took place in Canberra at the Australian Research Data Commons in March 2019.DARIAH has currently 17 members from all over Europe. Nevertheless, efforts should be made to include as many countries as possible to bring in and scale, to a European level, even more state-of-the-art DH activities.Six candidates ready for building strong national consortia have been identified, enabling a substantial expansion of DARIAH’s country coverage. Additionally, thematic workshops are organised in each country as well as tailored training measures.DESIR widens the research infrastructure in core areas which are vital for DARIAH’s sustainability but are not yet covered by the existing set-up. As DARIAH expands across Europe, continuously enhancing and further developing the ERIC exceeds DARIAH’s internal technological capacities. Two notable results were achieved so far: firstly, the publication of a technical reference as a result of a workshop organised in October 2017 with CESSDA and CLARIN. It’s a collection of basic guidelines and references for development and maintenance of infrastructure services within DARIAH and beyond, addressing an ongoing issue for research infrastructures, namely software sustainability. Secondly, the organisation of a Code Sprint, focusing on bibliographical and citation metadata, which helped shaping DARIAH’s profile in four technology areas (visualisation, text analytic services, entity-based search and scholarly content management). Another Code sprint is expected to take place in Summer 2019.Another output is the implementation of a centralized helpdesk. This helpdesk is hosted by CLARIN-D and the solution of integration within the existing DARIAH website was the creation of a WordPress plugin. This plugin is used to connect our website with the OTRS server and allows the creation of issues easily by users unfamiliar with OTRS.Sustaining a research infrastructure involves also two important aspects: trust and education. For DARIAH, it is crucial to increase trust and confidence from its users. In DESIR we develop recommendations and strategies accordingly, targeting new cross-disciplinary communities, based on the results of a survey and interviews addressed to the scientific community, with different levels of approach - national, institutional and individual.In addition, education is a key area and the project contributes to the ongoing discussions about the role and modalities of training and education in the development, consolidation and sustainability of digital research infrastructures. We believe that investing time and efforts into training and educating users is a way of securing the social sustainability of a research infrastructure.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wilms, Lotte; Cock, Michiel; Companjen, Ben;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: Netherlands

    International audience; Academic libraries in the Netherlands have the ambition to increase the knowledge level of their librarians on digital humanities (DH). Three libraries therefore set up a series of full-day training events aimed specifically at library professionals of academic and research libraries in the Netherlands, named DH Clinics. The aim of these clinics is to provide basic methodological competencies and technical skills in DH, for a diverse group of library employees, consisting of both subject and technical librarians with basic technical skills. The content of these sessions should 1) enable them to provide services to researchers and students, 2) identify remaining gaps in knowledge or skills that they could address by self-directed learning and 3) (possibly) to automate their daily library work. This paper describes final schedule of the DH Clinics, how we organised the design process by involving the user community and the lessons we learned.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Khemakhem, Mohamed; Herold, Axel; Romary, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    International audience; The last decade has seen a rapid development of the number of NLP tools which have been made available to the community. The usability of several e-lexicography tools represents a serious obstacle for researchers with little or no background in computer science. We present in this paper our efforts to overcome this issue in the case of a machine learning system for the automatic segmentation and semantic annotation of digitised dictionaries. Our approach is based on limiting the burdens of managing the tool's setup in different execution environments and lightening the complexity of the training process. We illustrate the possibility to reach this goal through the adaptation of existing functionalities and through using out of the box software deployment technology. We also report on the community's feedback after exposing the new setup to real users of different professional backgrounds.