search
Include:
The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
30 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2017-2021
  • Conference object
  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société
  • Archive ouverte UNIGE
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • English
    Authors: 
    Blandine Nouvel; Evelyne Sinigaglia; Véronique Humbert;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The aim of the talk is to present the methodology used to reorganise the PACTOLS thesaurus of Frantiq, launched within the framework of the MASA consortium. PACTOLS is a multilingual and open repository about archaeology from Prehistory to the present and for Classics. It is organized into six micro-thesaurus at the root of its name (Peuples, Anthroponymes,Chronologie, Toponymes, Oeuvres, Lieux, Sujets). The goal is to turn it into a tool interoperable with information systems beyond its original documentary purpose, and usable by archaeologists as a repository for managing scientific data. During the talk, we will describe the choice of tools, the organisation of work within the steering group and the collaborations with specialists for the upgrading and development of the vocabulary while showing the strengths and limitations of some experiments. Above allit will show how the introduction of the conceptual categories of the BackBone Thesaurus of DARIAH, modelled on the CIDOC-CRM ontology, through a progressive deconstruction/reconstruction process, eventually had an impact on all micro thesauri and questioned the organisation of knowledge so far proposed.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamé, M.; Pittet, P.; Federico Ponchio; Markhoff, B.; Sanfilippo, E. M.;
    Countries: France, Italy

    International audience; In this paper, we present an online communication-driven decision support system to align terms from a dataset with terms of another dataset (standardized controlled vocabulary or not). Heterotoki differs from existing proposals in that it takes place at the interface with humans, inviting the experts to commit on their definitions, so as to either agree to validate the mapping or to propose some enrichment to the terminologies. More precisely, differently to most of existing proposals that support terminology alignment, Heterotoki sustains the negotiation of meaning thanks to semantic coordination support within its interface design. This negotiation involves domain experts having produced multiple datasets.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Marlet , Olivier; Francart, Thomas; Markhoff, Béatrice; Rodier, Xavier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    International audience; CIDOC CRM is an ontology intended to facilitate the integration, mediation and interchange of heterogeneous cultural heritage information. The Semantic Web with its Linked Open Data cloud enables scholars and cultural institutions to publish their data in RDF, using CIDOC CRM as an interlingua that enables a semantically consistent re-interpretation of their data. Nowadays more and more projects have done the task of mapping legacy datasets to CIDOC CRM, and successful Extract-Transform-Load data-integration processes have been performed in this way. A next step is enabling people and applications to actually dynamically explore autonomous datasets using the semantic mediation offered by CIDOC CRM. This is the purpose of OpenArchaeo, a tool for querying archaeological datasets on the LOD cloud. We present its main features: the principles behind its user friendly query interface and its SPARQL Endpoint for programs, together with its overall architecture designed to be extendable and scalable, for handling transparent interconnections with evolving distributed sources while achieving good efficiency.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Chambers, Sally; Deroo, Katrien; Wout, Dillen; Dozo, Björn-Olav; Gheldof, Tom; Kestemont, Mike;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Digital Humanities is thriving in Belgium. As a Founding Member of DARIAH-EU, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, our aim is to offer a sustainable portfolio of services enabling digital scholarship in the arts and humanities. To realise this DARIAH partner institutions are encouraged to establish Digital Humanities Research Centres which together form a humanities-specific digital ecosystem, offering services both within their own institutions and to other institutions in Belgium and beyond. This poster presents four DH centres in Belgium: three existing centres; the Centre Informatique de Philosophie et Lettres (CIPL, Université de Liège), the University of Antwerp’s Platform for Digital Humanities (platform{DH}, UA) and the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities (GhentCDH, Ghent University) plus the Leuven Centre for Digital Humanities (LCDH, KU Leuven) which is currently being established. Finally, we share our experiences and lessons learned from establishing digital humanities centres in our own institutions and interconnecting them via the DARIAH network.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • Publication . Presentation . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access

    Slides presented at the EADH conference in Galway, 09.12.2018. OpenMethods (https://openmethods.dariah.eu) is a metablog aimed at republishing and bringing together all sorts of Open Access publications (e.g. research articles, preprints, blogs, videos, podcasts) about Digital Humanities methods and tools to spread the knowledge and raise peer recognition for them. The has been developed in the supervision of the DARIAH community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumouchel, Suzanne;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; This contribution will show how Access play a strong role in the creation and structuring of DARIAH, a European Digital Research Infrastructure in Arts and Humanities.To achieve this goal, this contribution will develop the concept of Access from five examples:_ Interdisciplinarity point of view_ Manage contradiction between national and international perspectives_ Involve different communities (not only researchers stakeholders)_ Manage tools and services_ Develop and use new collaboration toolsWe would like to demonstrate that speaking about Access always implies a selection, a choice, even in the perspective of "Open Access".

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    English
    Authors: 
    Jimenes, Rémi;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    International audience; Bibliographic data can be produced by different kind of people, responding to different purposes. An author can provide information about the origin of a quotation; a bookseller can offer the reader a catalogue of his supply; a printer handles the exact accounts of his stock; a librarian needs a file showing the precise location of a specific copy… From archives to printed books, we will try to give an overview of the different sources which can provide bibliographic data.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Vanden Daelen, Veerle; Drenth, Petra;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The mission of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) is to support the Holocaust research community by building a digital infrastructure and facilitating human networks. EHRI provides online access to information about dispersed sources relating to the Holocaust through its Online Portal, and tools and methods that enable researchers and archivists to collaboratively work with such sources. Apart from providing an online platform, EHRI also facilitates an extensive network of researchers, archivists and others to increase cohesion and co-ordination among practitioners and to initiate new transnational and collaborative approaches to the study of the Holocaust. EHRI thereby seeks to overcome one of the hallmark challenges of Holocaust research: the wide dispersal of the archival source material across Europe and beyond, and the concomitant fragmentation of Holocaust historiography. More than twenty organisations – research institutions, libraries, archives, museums and memorial sites – from 17 countries form a core working group, but EHRI equally relies on the support of many other individuals and organisations in the broad fields of Holocaust studies and digital humanities. With a poster presentation at the DARIAH-EU Annual Event 2017 in Berlin, the authors would like to present the resources and services EHRI has to offer to the research community, with a special emphasis on the EHRI Portal. The EHRI portal offers access to information on Holocaust-related archival material held in institutions across Europe and beyond. You can browse 57 country reports, 1,938 archival institutions in 51 countries, and 231,478 archival descriptions in 472 institutions (April 2017). Other EHRI resources and training include: Online Training in Holocaust Studies; Seminars and Workshops; Fellowship Programme; Conferences; Online Document Blog; Online Research Guides; and Tools and Methods for Digital History. Two features were highlighted: The relatively new EHRI Document Blog, and the successful EHRI Fellowships. The EHRI Document Blog is a space to share ideas about Holocaust-related archival documents, and their presentation and interpretation, using digital tools. The EHRI Fellowships support and stimulate Holocaust research by facilitating international access to key archives and collections as well as archival and digital humanities knowhow. The fellowships intend to support researchers, archivists, curators, and younger scholars. By bringing together experts from different fields, and by building an innovative digital infrastructure supported by a large community, EHRI is a flagship project that showcases the opportunities for historical research in the digital age. EHRI started its work in October 2010 with initial financial support from the European Union for four years. Thanks to the continued EU support, EHRI keeps on developing. EHRI is devoted to building a Holocaust research infrastructure that is sustained by its network and will have a right of existence on its own accord.https://portal.ehri-project.eu/www.ehri-project.eu