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80 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • DARIAH EU
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • English
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sander Münster; Ronja Utescher; Selda Ulutas Aydogan;
    Publisher: Springer Singapore

    AbstractIn research and policies, the identification of trends as well as emerging topics and topics in decline is an important source of information for both academic and innovation management. Since at present policy analysis mostly employs qualitative research methods, the following article presents and assesses different approaches – trend analysis based on questionnaires, quantitative bibliometric surveys, the use of computer-linguistic approaches and machine learning and qualitative investigations. Against this backdrop, this article examines digital applications in cultural heritage and, in particular, built heritage via various investigative frameworks to identify topics of relevance and trendlines, mainly for European Union (EU)-based research and policies. Furthermore, this article exemplifies and assesses the specific opportunities and limitations of the different methodical approaches against the backdrop of data-driven vs. data-guided analytical frameworks. As its major findings, our study shows that both research and policies related to digital applications for cultural heritage are mainly driven by the availability of new technologies. Since policies focus on meta-topics such as digitisation, openness or automation, the research descriptors are more granular. In general, data-driven approaches are promising for identifying topics and trendlines and even predicting the development of near future trends. Conversely, qualitative approaches are able to answer “why” questions with regard to whether topics are emerging due to disruptive innovations or due to new terminologies or whether topics are becoming obsolete because they are common knowledge, as is the case for the term “internet”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anna Foka; Osman Cenk Demiroglu; Elton Barker; Nasrin Mostofian; Kyriaki Konstantinidou; Brady Kiesling; Linda Talatas; Kajsa Palm;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för ABM
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract This progress article focuses on an overview of the potential and challenges of using contemporary Geographic Information System (GIS) applications for the visual rendering and analysis of textual spatial data. The case study is an ancient traveling narrative, Pausanias’s Description of Greece (Periegesis Hellados) which was written in the second century CE. First, we describe the process of converting the volumes to spatial data using a customized version of the open-source digital semantic annotation platform Recogito. Then the focus shifts to the implementation of collected and organized spatial data to a number of GIS applications: namely Google Maps, DARIAH Geo-Browser, Gephi, Palladio and ArcGIS. Through empirical experimentation with spatial data and their implementation in different platforms, our paper charts the ways in which contemporary GIS applications may be implemented to cast new light on ancient understandings of identity, space, and place.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Uiterwaal; Franco Niccolucci; Sheena Bassett; Steven Krauwer; Hella Hollander; Femmy Admiraal; Laurent Romary; George Bruseker; Carlo Meghini; Jennifer Edmond; +1 more
    Publisher: Edinburgh University Press for the Association for History and Computing,, Edinburgh , Regno Unito
    Countries: Italy, France, Netherlands, France, France, Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    This article has been accepted for publication by EUP in the IJHAC: International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (https://www.euppublishing.com/loi/ijhac); International audience; Since the first ESFRI roadmap in 2006, multiple humanities Research Infrastructures (RIs) have been set up all over the European continent, supporting archaeologists (ARIADNE), linguists (CLARIN-ERIC), Holocaust researchers (EHRI), cultural heritage specialists (IPERION-CH) and others. These examples only scratch the surface of the breadth of research communities that have benefited from close cooperation in the European Research Area.While each field developed discipline-specific services over the years, common themes can also be distinguished. All humanities RIs address, in varying degrees, questions around research data management, the use of standards and the desired interoperability of data across disciplinary boundaries.This article sheds light on how cluster project PARTHENOS developed pooled services and shared solutions for its audience of humanities researchers, RI managers and policymakers. In a time where the convergence of existing infrastructure is becoming ever more important – with the construction of a European Open Science Cloud as an audacious, ultimate goal – we hope that our experiences inform future work and provide inspiration on how to exploit synergies in interdisciplinary, transnational, scientific cooperation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tóth Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | OPERAS-P (871069)

    Text, techné and tenure: what remains out of scope of research evaluation in Humanities disciplines and how to change it for the better? (Slides presented at the OAI12 conference: https://oai.events/) Peer review is central scholarly practice that carries fundamental paradoxes from its inception. On the one hand, it is very difficult to open up peer review for the sake of empirical analysis, as it usually happens in closed black boxes of publishing and other gatekeeping workflows that are embedded in a myriad of disciplinary cultures, each of which comes very different, and usually competing notions of excellence. On the other hand, it is a practice that carries an enormous weight in terms of gatekeeping; shaping disciplines, publication patterns and power relations within academia. This central role of peer review alone explains why it is crucial to study to better understand situated evaluation practices, and to continually rethink them to strive for their best, and least imperfect (or reasonably imperfect) instances. How the notion of excellence and other peer review proxies are constructed and (re)negotiated in everyday practices across the SSH disciplines; who are involved in the processes and who remain out; what are the boundaries of peer review in terms of inclusiveness with content types; and how the processes are aligned or misaligned to research realities? What are the underlying reasons behind the persistence of certain proxies in the system and what are emerging trends and future innovations? To gain an in-depth understanding of these questions, as part of the H2020 project OPERAS-P, our task force collected and analysed 32 in-depth interviews with scholars about their motivations, challenges and experiences with novel practices in scholarly writing and in peer-review. The presentation will showcase the results of this study. Focus will be on the conflict between the richness of contemporary scholarship and the prestige economy that defines our current academic evaluation culture. The encoded and pseudonymized interview transcripts that form the basis of our analysis will be shared as open data in a certified data repository together with a rich documentation of the process so that our interpretations, conclusions and the resulting recommendations are clearly delineable from the rich input we had been working with and which are thus openly reusable for other purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    S. Münster; K. Fritsche; H. Richards-Rissetto; Fabrizio Ivan Apollonio; B. Aehnlich; V. Schwartze; R. Smolarski;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Country: Italy

    Abstract. Digital literacy and technology education has gained much relevance in humanities and heritage related disciplines during the recent decades. Against this background, the purpose of this article is to examine the current state of educational programs in digital cultural heritage and related disciplines primarily in Europe with supplemental information from the US. A further aim is to highlight core topics, challenges, and demands, and to show innovative formats and prospects.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Lehrbass;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) allows burdening a clearing obligation on non-financial corporations, which formerly did not necessarily clear their business. We give 10 recommendations on how to cope with this obligation. These are motivated by a case study for which we consider a stylized German power producer. For this entity, we derive optimal levels of planned production and forward sales of power using microeconomic theory. Since this results in a significant short position in the German power forward market, we investigate the resulting variation margin call dynamics with a special interest in the ability to forecast worst-case price up moves. We compare different models for the forward log-returns and their performance in 99% quantile forecasting. A GARCH model with Student-t distribution emerges as the most suitable model. This is used in the case study, which is inspired by data published by the power producer E.ON. Using recent material from the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision we distill the reliable liquidity buffer from an allegedly rich liquidity position and show how suddenly it can be eroded. We point to feedback loops, which make the challenges—posed by the clearing obligation—even more severe. We also spend some thoughts on how to cope with the crisis caused by Corona.

  • Publication . Report . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maryl, Maciej; Błaszczyńska, Marta; Zalotyńska, Agnieszka; Taylor, Laurence; Avanço, Karla; Balula, Ana; Buchner, Anna; Caliman, Lorena; Clivaz, Claire; Costa, Carlos; +21 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Croatia, France
    Project: EC | OPERAS-P (871069)

    This report discusses the scholarly communication issues in Social Sciences and Humanities that are relevant to the future development and functioning of OPERAS. The outcomes collected here can be divided into two groups of innovations regarding 1) the operation of OPERAS, and 2) its activities. The “operational” issues include the ways in which an innovative research infrastructure should be governed (Chapter 1) as well as the business models for open access publications in Social Sciences and Humanities (Chapter 2). The other group of issues is dedicated to strategic areas where OPERAS and its services may play an instrumental role in providing, enabling, or unlocking innovation: FAIR data (Chapter 3), bibliodiversity and multilingualism in scholarly communication (Chapter 4), the future of scholarly writing (Chapter 5), and quality assessment (Chapter 6). Each chapter provides an overview of the main findings and challenges with emphasis on recommendations for OPERAS and other stakeholders like e-infrastructures, publishers, SSH researchers, research performing organisations, policy makers, and funders. Links to data and further publications stemming from work concerning particular tasks are located at the end of each chapter.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Enrico Daga; Luigi Asprino; Rossana Damiano; Marilena Daquino; Belen Diaz Agudo; Aldo Gangemi; Tsvi Kuflik; Antonio Lieto; Mark Maguire; Anna Maria Marras; +5 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Polifonia (101004746), EC | SPICE (870811)

    Digital archives of memory institutions are typically concerned with the cataloguing of artefacts of artistic, historical, and cultural value. Recently, new forms of citizen participation in cultural heritage have emerged, producing a wealth of material spanning from visitors’ experiential feedback on exhibitions and cultural artefacts to digitally mediated interactions like the ones happening on social media platforms. Citizen curation is proposed in the context of the European project SPICE (Social Participation, Cohesion, and Inclusion through Cultural Engagement) as a methodology for producing, collecting, interpreting, and archiving people’s responses to cultural objects, with the aim of favouring the emergence of multiple, sometimes conflicting, viewpoints and motivating users and memory institutions to reflect upon them. We argue that citizen curation urges to rethink the nature of computational infrastructures supporting data management of memory institutions, bringing novel challenges that include issues of distribution, authoritativeness, interdependence, privacy, and rights management. To approach these issues, we survey relevant literature toward a distributed, Linked Data infrastructure, with a focus on identifying the roles and requirements involved in such an infrastructure. We show how existing research can contribute significantly in facing the challenges raised by citizen curation and discuss challenges and opportunities from the socio-technical standpoint.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Buddenbohm; Maaike A. de Jong; Jean-Luc Minel; Yoann Moranville;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    AbstractHow can researchers identify suitable research data repositories for the deposit of their research data? Which repository matches best the technical and legal requirements of a specific research project? For this end and with a humanities perspective the Data Deposit Recommendation Service (DDRS) has been developed as a prototype. It not only serves as a functional service for selecting humanities research data repositories but it is particularly a technical demonstrator illustrating the potential of re-using an already existing infrastructure - in this case re3data - and the feasibility to set up this kind of service for other research disciplines. The documentation and the code of this project can be found in the DARIAH GitHub repository: https://dariah-eric.github.io/ddrs/.

  • Publication . Presentation . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Buddenbohm, Stefan; Moranville, Yoann;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    The DDRS - or Data Deposit Recommendation Service - recommends research data repositories to humanities researchers searching for deposit services for their research data, which comply to criteria such as PIDs, funders’ requirements, disciplinary scope or language preferences. The presentation shows the DDRS as re3data use case and explains how the relation between the web service (DDRS) and re3data for the information retrieval is implemented. The DDRS is a demonstrator has been delivered in 2017 within the Humanities at Scale project, a DARIAH-EU undertaking, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 675570. {"references": ["https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03020703v1"]}

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
80 Research products, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sander Münster; Ronja Utescher; Selda Ulutas Aydogan;
    Publisher: Springer Singapore

    AbstractIn research and policies, the identification of trends as well as emerging topics and topics in decline is an important source of information for both academic and innovation management. Since at present policy analysis mostly employs qualitative research methods, the following article presents and assesses different approaches – trend analysis based on questionnaires, quantitative bibliometric surveys, the use of computer-linguistic approaches and machine learning and qualitative investigations. Against this backdrop, this article examines digital applications in cultural heritage and, in particular, built heritage via various investigative frameworks to identify topics of relevance and trendlines, mainly for European Union (EU)-based research and policies. Furthermore, this article exemplifies and assesses the specific opportunities and limitations of the different methodical approaches against the backdrop of data-driven vs. data-guided analytical frameworks. As its major findings, our study shows that both research and policies related to digital applications for cultural heritage are mainly driven by the availability of new technologies. Since policies focus on meta-topics such as digitisation, openness or automation, the research descriptors are more granular. In general, data-driven approaches are promising for identifying topics and trendlines and even predicting the development of near future trends. Conversely, qualitative approaches are able to answer “why” questions with regard to whether topics are emerging due to disruptive innovations or due to new terminologies or whether topics are becoming obsolete because they are common knowledge, as is the case for the term “internet”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anna Foka; Osman Cenk Demiroglu; Elton Barker; Nasrin Mostofian; Kyriaki Konstantinidou; Brady Kiesling; Linda Talatas; Kajsa Palm;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för ABM
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract This progress article focuses on an overview of the potential and challenges of using contemporary Geographic Information System (GIS) applications for the visual rendering and analysis of textual spatial data. The case study is an ancient traveling narrative, Pausanias’s Description of Greece (Periegesis Hellados) which was written in the second century CE. First, we describe the process of converting the volumes to spatial data using a customized version of the open-source digital semantic annotation platform Recogito. Then the focus shifts to the implementation of collected and organized spatial data to a number of GIS applications: namely Google Maps, DARIAH Geo-Browser, Gephi, Palladio and ArcGIS. Through empirical experimentation with spatial data and their implementation in different platforms, our paper charts the ways in which contemporary GIS applications may be implemented to cast new light on ancient understandings of identity, space, and place.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Uiterwaal; Franco Niccolucci; Sheena Bassett; Steven Krauwer; Hella Hollander; Femmy Admiraal; Laurent Romary; George Bruseker; Carlo Meghini; Jennifer Edmond; +1 more
    Publisher: Edinburgh University Press for the Association for History and Computing,, Edinburgh , Regno Unito
    Countries: Italy, France, Netherlands, France, France, Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    This article has been accepted for publication by EUP in the IJHAC: International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (https://www.euppublishing.com/loi/ijhac); International audience; Since the first ESFRI roadmap in 2006, multiple humanities Research Infrastructures (RIs) have been set up all over the European continent, supporting archaeologists (ARIADNE), linguists (CLARIN-ERIC), Holocaust researchers (EHRI), cultural heritage specialists (IPERION-CH) and others. These examples only scratch the surface of the breadth of research communities that have benefited from close cooperation in the European Research Area.While each field developed discipline-specific services over the years, common themes can also be distinguished. All humanities RIs address, in varying degrees, questions around research data management, the use of standards and the desired interoperability of data across disciplinary boundaries.This article sheds light on how cluster project PARTHENOS developed pooled services and shared solutions for its audience of humanities researchers, RI managers and policymakers. In a time where the convergence of existing infrastructure is becoming ever more important – with the construction of a European Open Science Cloud as an audacious, ultimate goal – we hope that our experiences inform future work and provide inspiration on how to exploit synergies in interdisciplinary, transnational, scientific cooperation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tóth Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | OPERAS-P (871069)

    Text, techné and tenure: what remains out of scope of research evaluation in Humanities disciplines and how to change it for the better? (Slides presented at the OAI12 conference: https://oai.events/) Peer review is central scholarly practice that carries fundamental paradoxes from its inception. On the one hand, it is very difficult to open up peer review for the sake of empirical analysis, as it usually happens in closed black boxes of publishing and other gatekeeping workflows that are embedded in a myriad of disciplinary cultures, each of which comes very different, and usually competing notions of excellence. On the other hand, it is a practice that carries an enormous weight in terms of gatekeeping; shaping disciplines, publication patterns and power relations within academia. This central role of peer review alone explains why it is crucial to study to better understand situated evaluation practices, and to continually rethink them to strive for their best, and least imperfect (or reasonably imperfect) instances. How the notion of excellence and other peer review proxies are constructed and (re)negotiated in everyday practices across the SSH disciplines; who are involved in the processes and who remain out; what are the boundaries of peer review in terms of inclusiveness with content types; and how the processes are aligned or misaligned to research realities? What are the underlying reasons behind the persistence of certain proxies in the system and what are emerging trends and future innovations? To gain an in-depth understanding of these questions, as part of the H2020 project OPERAS-P, our task force collected and analysed 32 in-depth interviews with scholars about their motivations, challenges and experiences with novel practices in scholarly writing and in peer-review. The presentation will showcase the results of this study. Focus will be on the conflict between the richness of contemporary scholarship and the prestige economy that defines our current academic evaluation culture. The encoded and pseudonymized interview transcripts that form the basis of our analysis will be shared as open data in a certified data repository together with a rich documentation of the process so that our interpretations, conclusions and the resulting recommendations are clearly delineable from the rich input we had been working with and which are thus openly reusable for other purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    S. Münster; K. Fritsche; H. Richards-Rissetto; Fabrizio Ivan Apollonio; B. Aehnlich; V. Schwartze; R. Smolarski;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Country: Italy

    Abstract. Digital literacy and technology education has gained much relevance in humanities and heritage related disciplines during the recent decades. Against this background, the purpose of this article is to examine the current state of educational programs in digital cultural heritage and related disciplines primarily in Europe with supplemental information from the US. A further aim is to highlight core topics, challenges, and demands, and to show innovative formats and prospects.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Lehrbass;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) allows burdening a clearing obligation on non-financial corporations, which formerly did not necessarily clear their business. We give 10 recommendations on how to cope with this obligation. These are motivated by a case study for which we consider a stylized German power producer. For this entity, we derive optimal levels of planned production and forward sales of power using microeconomic theory. Since this results in a significant short position in the German power forward market, we investigate the resulting variation margin call dynamics with a special interest in the ability to forecast worst-case price up moves. We compare different models for the forward log-returns and their performance in 99% quantile forecasting. A GARCH model with Student-t distribution emerges as the most suitable model. This is used in the case study, which is inspired by data published by the power producer E.ON. Using recent material from the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision we distill the reliable liquidity buffer from an allegedly rich liquidity position and show how suddenly it can be eroded. We point to feedback loops, which make the challenges—posed by the clearing obligation—even more severe. We also spend some thoughts on how to cope with the crisis caused by Corona.

  • Publication . Report . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maryl, Maciej; Błaszczyńska, Marta; Zalotyńska, Agnieszka; Taylor, Laurence; Avanço, Karla; Balula, Ana; Buchner, Anna; Caliman, Lorena; Clivaz, Claire; Costa, Carlos; +21 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Croatia, France
    Project: EC | OPERAS-P (871069)

    This report discusses the scholarly communication issues in Social Sciences and Humanities that are relevant to the future development and functioning of OPERAS. The outcomes collected here can be divided into two groups of innovations regarding 1) the operation of OPERAS, and 2) its activities. The “operational” issues include the ways in which an innovative research infrastructure should be governed (Chapter 1) as well as the business models for open access publications in Social Sciences and Humanities (Chapter 2). The other group of issues is dedicated to strategic areas where OPERAS and its services may play an instrumental role in providing, enabling, or unlocking innovation: FAIR data (Chapter 3), bibliodiversity and multilingualism in scholarly communication (Chapter 4), the future of scholarly writing (Chapter 5), and quality assessment (Chapter 6). Each chapter provides an overview of the main findings and challenges with emphasis on recommendations for OPERAS and other stakeholders like e-infrastructures, publishers, SSH researchers, research performing organisations, policy makers, and funders. Links to data and further publications stemming from work concerning particular tasks are located at the end of each chapter.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Enrico Daga; Luigi Asprino; Rossana Damiano; Marilena Daquino; Belen Diaz Agudo; Aldo Gangemi; Tsvi Kuflik; Antonio Lieto; Mark Maguire; Anna Maria Marras; +5 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Polifonia (101004746), EC | SPICE (870811)

    Digital archives of memory institutions are typically concerned with the cataloguing of artefacts of artistic, historical, and cultural value. Recently, new forms of citizen participation in cultural heritage have emerged, producing a wealth of material spanning from visitors’ experiential feedback on exhibitions and cultural artefacts to digitally mediated interactions like the ones happening on social media platforms. Citizen curation is proposed in the context of the European project SPICE (Social Participation, Cohesion, and Inclusion through Cultural Engagement) as a methodology for producing, collecting, interpreting, and archiving people’s responses to cultural objects, with the aim of favouring the emergence of multiple, sometimes conflicting, viewpoints and motivating users and memory institutions to reflect upon them. We argue that citizen curation urges to rethink the nature of computational infrastructures supporting data management of memory institutions, bringing novel challenges that include issues of distribution, authoritativeness, interdependence, privacy, and rights management. To approach these issues, we survey relevant literature toward a distributed, Linked Data infrastructure, with a focus on identifying the roles and requirements involved in such an infrastructure. We show how existing research can contribute significantly in facing the challenges raised by citizen curation and discuss challenges and opportunities from the socio-technical standpoint.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Buddenbohm; Maaike A. de Jong; Jean-Luc Minel; Yoann Moranville;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    AbstractHow can researchers identify suitable research data repositories for the deposit of their research data? Which repository matches best the technical and legal requirements of a specific research project? For this end and with a humanities perspective the Data Deposit Recommendation Service (DDRS) has been developed as a prototype. It not only serves as a functional service for selecting humanities research data repositories but it is particularly a technical demonstrator illustrating the potential of re-using an already existing infrastructure - in this case re3data - and the feasibility to set up this kind of service for other research disciplines. The documentation and the code of this project can be found in the DARIAH GitHub repository: https://dariah-eric.github.io/ddrs/.

  • Publication . Presentation . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Buddenbohm, Stefan; Moranville, Yoann;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    The DDRS - or Data Deposit Recommendation Service - recommends research data repositories to humanities researchers searching for deposit services for their research data, which comply to criteria such as PIDs, funders’ requirements, disciplinary scope or language preferences. The presentation shows the DDRS as re3data use case and explains how the relation between the web service (DDRS) and re3data for the information retrieval is implemented. The DDRS is a demonstrator has been delivered in 2017 within the Humanities at Scale project, a DARIAH-EU undertaking, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 675570. {"references": ["https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03020703v1"]}