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  • Authors: Dombrowski, Quinn; Fischer, Frank; Edmond, Jennifer; Tasovac, Toma; +11 Authors

    International audience; DARIAH, the digital humanities infrastructure with origins and an organisational home in Europe, is nearing the completion of its implementation phase. The significant investment from the European Commission and member countries has yielded a robust set of technical and social infrastructures, ranging from working groups, various registries, pedagogical materials, and software to support diverse approaches to digital humanities scholarship. While the funding and leadership of DARIAH to date has come from countries in, or contiguous with, Europe, the needs that drive its technical and social development are widely shared within the international digital humanities community beyond Europe. Scholars on every continent would benefit from well-supported technical tools and platforms, directories for facilitating access to information and resources, and support for working groups.The DARIAH Beyond Europe workshop series, organised and financed under the umbrella of the DESIR project (“DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined,” 2017–2019, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program), convened three meetings between September 2018 and March 2019 in the United States and Australia. These workshops served as fora for cross-cultural exchange, and introduced many non-European DH scholars to DARIAH; each of the workshops included a significant delegation from various DARIAH bodies, together with a larger number of local presenters and participants. The local contexts for these workshops were significantly different in their embodiment of research infrastructures: on the one hand, in the U.S., a private research university (Stanford) and the de facto national library (the Library of Congress), both in a country with a history of unsuccessful national-scale infrastructure efforts; and in Australia, a system which has invested substantially more in coordinated national research infrastructure in science and technology, but very little on a national scale in the humanities and arts. Europe is in many respects ahead of both host countries in terms of its research infrastructure ecosystem both at the national and pan-European levels.The Stanford workshop had four main topics of focus: corpus management; text and image analysis; geohumanities; and music, theatre, and sound studies. As the first of the workshops, the Stanford group also took the lead in proposing next steps toward exploring actionable “DARIAH beyond Europe” initiatives, including the beginnings of a blog shared among participants from all the workshops, extra-European use of DARIAH’s DH Course Registry, and non-European participation in DARIAH Working Groups.The overall theme of the Library of Congress workshop was “Collections as Data,” building on a number of U.S.-based initiatives exploring how to enhance researcher engagement with digital collections through computationally-driven research. In Washington, D.C., the knowledge exchange sessions focussed on digitised newspapers and text analysis, infrastructural challenges for public humanities, and the use of web-archives in DH research. As at Stanford, interconnecting with DARIAH Working Groups was of core interest to participants, and a new Working Group was proposed to explore global access and use of digitised historical newspapers. A further important outcome was the agreement to explore collaboration between the U.S.-based “Collections as Data” initiatives and the Heritage Data Reuse Charter in Europe. The third and final workshop in the series took place in March 2019 in Australia, hosted by the National Library of Australia in Canberra. Convened by the Australian Academy of the Humanities (AAH), together with the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) and DARIAH, this event was co-located with the Academy’s second annual Humanities, Arts and Culture Data Summit. The first day of the event, targeted at research leadership and policy makers, was intended to explore new horizons for data-driven humanities and arts research, digital cultural collections and research infrastructure. The two subsequent days focused on engaging with a wide variety of communities, including (digital) humanities researchers and cultural heritage professionals. Organised around a series of Knowledge Exchange Sessions, combined with research-led lightning talks, the participants spoke in detail about how big ideas can be implemented practically on the ground. This poster reflects on the key outcomes and future directions arising from these three workshops, and considers what it might look like for DARIAH to be adopted as a fundamental DH infrastructure in a complex variety of international, national, and regional contexts, with diverse funding models, resources, needs, and expectations. One major outcome of all workshops was the shared recognition that, in spite of extensive funding, planning, and goodwill, these workshops were not nearly global enough in their reach: most importantly they were not inclusive of the Global South. Our new DARIAH beyond Europe community has a strong shared commitment to address this gap.

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    Authors: Boukhelifa , Nadia; Giannisakis , Emmanouil; Dimara , Evanthia; Willett , Wesley; +1 Authors

    International audience; In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of a visual analytics tool to support historical research. Historians continuously gather data related to their scholarly research from archival visits and background search. Organising and making sense of all this data can be challenging as many historians continue to rely on analog or basic digital tools. We built an integrated note-taking environment for historians which unifies a set of func-tionalities we identified as important for historical research including editing, tagging, searching, sharing and visualization. Our approach was to involve users from the initial stage of brainstorming and requirement analysis through to design, implementation and evaluation. We report on the process and results of our work, and conclude by reflecting on our own experience in conducting user-centered visual analytics design for digital humanities.

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    ProdInra
    Conference object . 2015
    License: CC BY SA
    Data sources: ProdInra
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  • Authors: Romary, Laurent; Puren, Marie;

    International audience; Le projet européen Iperion regroupe un ensemble d'acteurs européens offrant des services d'infrastructure pour l'étude du patrimoine matériel sous la forme d'équipements fixes ou mobiles. Ces différents services génèrent potentiellement de grandes quantités de données qu'il est nécessaire de gérer et documenter. En particulier, il semble utile de travailler à la constitution d'un réservoir de telles données qui soit consultable par une large communauté de chercheurs, notamment en sciences humaines. On peut ainsi penser au rôle que peuvent jouer des analyses précises d'une oeuvre pour un historien des arts qui souhaite étudier l'évolution de la technique d'un peintre par exemple. La mise en place d'une telle infrastructure de données réutilisables dans le domaine du patrimoine matériel se heurte cependant à plusieurs difficultés que nous essayons de réduire au sein du projet Iperion. Tout d'abord, il n'est pas nécessairement dans la culture du déploiement des équipements eux-mêmes d'envisager une réutilisation large des données. Le scénario de base est souvent celui d'un chercheur qui va conduire une analyse ciblée d'un objet patrimonial, pour ensuite exploiter lui-même les résultats correspondants et passer à l'analyse suivante, sans se préoccuper d'une réutilisation des données produites. Ensuite, du point de vue des formats de données, on observe l'absence de réels standards de représentation communs aux différents types d'équipements. On se retrouve ainsi à devoir gérer des données propriétaires qui dépendent principalement des constructeurs des équipements. Enfin, se posele problème complexe des droits d'utilisation qui combinent un ensemble de difficultés liées au statut des oeuvres elles-mêmes, aux règles régissant l'équipement, mais aussi à la volonté de partage du chercheur qui a effectué le recueil initial des données. Dans ce cadre, notre objectif est de mettre en place une démarche d'analyse de l'état des lieux et de proposition de principes communs de gestion des données au sein du projet. Il s'agirait ainsi de préfigurer une charte de gestion des données applicable à la future infrastructure européenne E-RIHS, en collaboration avec l'infrastructure numérique DARIAH en sciences humaines. Nous avons ainsi recueilli les réponses des différents partenaires du projet concernant à la fois les modes de gestion des équipements, et le statut des jeux de données disponibles. La variété des réponses obtenues montre déjà que seules des recommandations génériques pourront être produites à l'échelle européenne, et nous esquisserons quelques propositions dans ce sens. Laurent Romary est directeur de recherche à Inria où il mène des recherches dans le domaine des humanités numériques et plus particulièrement sur la modélisation et la représentation de données en sciences humaines et sociales. Depuis plusieurs années, il a contribué à la définition des politiques d'information scientifique du CNRS, de la société Max Planck et d'Inria, où il a contribué notamment à la définition d'une obligation de dépôt en archives ouvertes dans HAL. Il a aussi participé de longue date à la définition et à l'évolution des directives de la TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), notamment comme membre, mais aussi comme président du conseil technique de la TEI, et préside le comité 37 de l'ISO (Organisation international de normalisation). Il dirige l'infrastructure Européenne DARIAH pour le développement de méthodes numériques en sciences humaines et sociales. https://cv.archives-ouvertes.fr/laurentromary

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    Authors: Raciti, Marco; Gabay, Simon; Moranville, Yoann; Jorge, Maria Do Rosário; +1 Authors

    International audience; Europe has a long and rich tradition as a centre of research and teaching in the arts and humanities. However, the huge digital transformation that affects the arts and humanities research landscape all over the world requires that we set up sustainable research infrastructures, new and refined techniques, state-of-the-art methods and an expanded skills base. Responding to these challenges, the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) was launched as a pan-European network and research infrastructure. After expansion and consolidation, which involved DARIAH’s inclusion in the ESFRI roadmap, DARIAH became a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) in 2014. The Horizon 2020 funded project DESIR (DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined) sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and help establish it as a reliable long-term partner within our communities. Sustaining existing digital expertise, tools, resources in Europe in the context of DESIR involves a goal-oriented set of measures in order to first, maintain, expand and develop DARIAH in its capacities as an organisation and technical research infrastructure; secondly, to engage its members further, as well as measure and increase their trust in DARIAH; thirdly, to expand the network in order to integrate new regions and communities. The DESIR consortium is composed of core DARIAH members, representatives from potential new DARIAH members and external technical experts. The sustainability of a research infrastructure is the capacity to remain operative, effective and competitive over its expected lifetime. In DESIR, this definition is translated into an evolving 6-dimensional process, divided into the following challenges:•Dissemination•Growth•Technology•Robustness•Trust•EducationWith our poster, we would like to show how the project helps sustaining DARIAH. Within DESIR, dissemination is the ability to communicate DARIAH’s strategy and benefits effectively within the DARIAH community and in new areas, spreading out to new communities. Through the international workshops held at Stanford University and at the Library of Congress, DARIAH has been introduced to many non-European DH scholars. These events were an important first step to foster international cooperation between US and European colleagues as well as a catalyst for ongoing collaborations in the future. A third workshop took place in Canberra at the Australian Research Data Commons in March 2019.DARIAH has currently 17 members from all over Europe. Nevertheless, efforts should be made to include as many countries as possible to bring in and scale, to a European level, even more state-of-the-art DH activities.Six candidates ready for building strong national consortia have been identified, enabling a substantial expansion of DARIAH’s country coverage. Additionally, thematic workshops are organised in each country as well as tailored training measures.DESIR widens the research infrastructure in core areas which are vital for DARIAH’s sustainability but are not yet covered by the existing set-up. As DARIAH expands across Europe, continuously enhancing and further developing the ERIC exceeds DARIAH’s internal technological capacities. Two notable results were achieved so far: firstly, the publication of a technical reference as a result of a workshop organised in October 2017 with CESSDA and CLARIN. It’s a collection of basic guidelines and references for development and maintenance of infrastructure services within DARIAH and beyond, addressing an ongoing issue for research infrastructures, namely software sustainability. Secondly, the organisation of a Code Sprint, focusing on bibliographical and citation metadata, which helped shaping DARIAH’s profile in four technology areas (visualisation, text analytic services, entity-based search and scholarly content management). Another Code sprint is expected to take place in Summer 2019.Another output is the implementation of a centralized helpdesk. This helpdesk is hosted by CLARIN-D and the solution of integration within the existing DARIAH website was the creation of a WordPress plugin. This plugin is used to connect our website with the OTRS server and allows the creation of issues easily by users unfamiliar with OTRS.Sustaining a research infrastructure involves also two important aspects: trust and education. For DARIAH, it is crucial to increase trust and confidence from its users. In DESIR we develop recommendations and strategies accordingly, targeting new cross-disciplinary communities, based on the results of a survey and interviews addressed to the scientific community, with different levels of approach - national, institutional and individual.In addition, education is a key area and the project contributes to the ongoing discussions about the role and modalities of training and education in the development, consolidation and sustainability of digital research infrastructures. We believe that investing time and efforts into training and educating users is a way of securing the social sustainability of a research infrastructure.

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    Hyper Article en Ligne
    Other literature type . 2019
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    Authors: Scharnhorst, Andrea; Admiraal, Femmy; van Kranenburg, Peter; Guillotel-Nothmann, Christophe; +1 Authors

    This paper takes as an example the envisioned portal of the newly started Polifonia project that interlinks resources from very rich, old, established archives while making optimal use of the latest semantic web technologies. In the project, ten research pilots, spanning from historical bells and organ heritage, classification of polyphonic notated music, to the historical role of music in children's lives, form the driving force behind the development of the dedicated interface. Based on a mixture of participation and participatory observation, we describe and reflect on the processes involved in making the portal. In other words - exemplified with the case of Polifonia - we reflect on the role of interfaces (of various types, shapes, manifestations and/or durations) to organise knowledge in an interdisciplinary project. In particular, we focus on the role of data management within the project as a key component of research methodology and cross-disciplinary collaboration, rather than an administrative exercise. The knowledge generated by this part of the project serves at least three different purposes: (1) to envision new research questions (competence questions) guiding the engineering backbone processes; (2) to define the future elements of the portal both for experts, other researchers, wider public and specific parts of the wider public; and last but not least, (3) the documentation task needed to support reproducibility and FAIRness of all data processes. Figure 1 below illustrates how the three components, namely the sociotechnical roadmap of the portal, the ontology-based knowledge graphs created in the research pilots, and the data management plan form three complementary components of the Polifonia project, that ultimately all feed into the web portal. In this paper, we claim that behind any interface there is the need for a layer of interfaces that form the basis of the final interface visible to the public. These procedural, intermediary, interfaces take the form of meetings, shared notes, github presence - and will result in products of their own (Data Management Plan, knowledge graphs), as well as inform the decisions during the process of designing the portal.

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    ZENODO
    Presentation . 2021
    License: CC BY
    Data sources: Datacite
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    ZENODO
    Other literature type . 2021
    License: CC BY
    Data sources: ZENODO
    KNAW Pure
    Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Data sources: KNAW Pure
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      Other literature type . 2021
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  • Authors: Romary, Laurent; Biabiany, Damien; Illmayer, Klaus; Puren, Marie; +3 Authors

    International audience

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  • Authors: Lopez, Patrice; Meyer, Alexander; Romary, Laurent;

    International audience; CENDARI (Collaborative European Digital Archive Infrastructure) is a research infrastructure project aimed at integrating digital archives and resources for research on medieval and modern European history.The project brings together information and computer scientists with historians and existing historical research infrastructures (archives, libraries, other digital projects) to improve conditions for digital historical scholarship. CENDARIhas engaged in extensive networking with the archives and libraries of Europe, especially those in Eastern Europe.CENDARI is a 4-year, European-Commission-funded project led by Trinity College Dublin, in partnership with 14 institutions across 8 countries.

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  • Authors: Medves, Maud; Romary, Laurent;

    International audience; This paper presents the work carried out within the EU Cendari project to provide an appropriate customisation of the EAG format that would fulfil the expectations of researchers in contemporary and medieval history describing where they could find collections and documents of specific interests. After describing the general data landscape that we have to deal with in the Cendari project, we specifically address the data entry and acquisition scenario to identify how this impacts on the actual data structures to be handled. We then present how we implemented such constraints by means of a full TEI/ODD specification of EAG and point out the main changes we made, which we think could also contribute to the further evolution of the EAG setting at large. We end up providing a wider picture of what we think could be the future of archival formats (EAG, EAD, EAC) if we want them to be more coherent and more sustainable at the service of both archives and researchers.

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  • Authors: Ribbe, Paulin; Engelhardt, Claudia; Larrousse, Nicolas; Leone, Claudio; +4 Authors

    International audience

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    Authors: Vanden Daelen, Veerle; Edmond, Jennifer; Links, Petra; Priddy, Mike; +3 Authors

    International audience; One of the funded project proposals under DARIAH’s Open Humanities call 2015 was “Open History: Sustainable digital publishing of archival catalogues of twentieth-century history archives”. Based on the experiences of the Collaborative EuropeaN Digital Archival Research Infrastructure (CENDARI) and the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI), the main goal of the “Open History” project was to enhance the dialogue between (meta-)data providers and research infrastructures. Integrating archival descriptions – when they were already available – held at a wide variety of twentieth-century history archives (from classic archives to memorial sites, libraries and private archives) into research infrastructures has proven to be a major challenge, which could not be done without some degree of limited to extensive pre-processing or other preparatory work. The “Open History” project organized two workshops and developed two tools: an easily accessible and general article on why the practice of standardization and sharing is important and how this can be achieved; and a model which provides checklists for self-analyses of archival institutions. The text that follows is the article we have developed. It intentionally remains at a general level, without much jargon, so that it can be easily read by those who are non-archivists or non-IT. Hence, we hope it will be easy to understand for both those who are describing the sources at various archives (with or without IT or archival sciences degrees), as well as decision-makers (directors and advisory boards) who wish to understand the benefits of investing in standardization and sharing of data. It is important to note is that this text is a first step, not a static, final result. Not all aspects about standardization and publication of (meta-)data are discussed, nor are updates or feedback mechanisms for annotations and comments discussed. The idea is that this text can be used in full or in part and that it will include further chapters and section updates as time goes by and as other communities begin using it. Some archives will read through much of these and see confirmation of what they have already been implementing; others – especially the smaller institutions, such as private memory institutions – will find this a low-key and hands-on introduction to help them in their efforts.

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    Hal-Diderot
    Other literature type . 2016
    Data sources: Hal-Diderot
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    Other literature type . 2016
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  • Authors: Dombrowski, Quinn; Fischer, Frank; Edmond, Jennifer; Tasovac, Toma; +11 Authors

    International audience; DARIAH, the digital humanities infrastructure with origins and an organisational home in Europe, is nearing the completion of its implementation phase. The significant investment from the European Commission and member countries has yielded a robust set of technical and social infrastructures, ranging from working groups, various registries, pedagogical materials, and software to support diverse approaches to digital humanities scholarship. While the funding and leadership of DARIAH to date has come from countries in, or contiguous with, Europe, the needs that drive its technical and social development are widely shared within the international digital humanities community beyond Europe. Scholars on every continent would benefit from well-supported technical tools and platforms, directories for facilitating access to information and resources, and support for working groups.The DARIAH Beyond Europe workshop series, organised and financed under the umbrella of the DESIR project (“DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined,” 2017–2019, funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program), convened three meetings between September 2018 and March 2019 in the United States and Australia. These workshops served as fora for cross-cultural exchange, and introduced many non-European DH scholars to DARIAH; each of the workshops included a significant delegation from various DARIAH bodies, together with a larger number of local presenters and participants. The local contexts for these workshops were significantly different in their embodiment of research infrastructures: on the one hand, in the U.S., a private research university (Stanford) and the de facto national library (the Library of Congress), both in a country with a history of unsuccessful national-scale infrastructure efforts; and in Australia, a system which has invested substantially more in coordinated national research infrastructure in science and technology, but very little on a national scale in the humanities and arts. Europe is in many respects ahead of both host countries in terms of its research infrastructure ecosystem both at the national and pan-European levels.The Stanford workshop had four main topics of focus: corpus management; text and image analysis; geohumanities; and music, theatre, and sound studies. As the first of the workshops, the Stanford group also took the lead in proposing next steps toward exploring actionable “DARIAH beyond Europe” initiatives, including the beginnings of a blog shared among participants from all the workshops, extra-European use of DARIAH’s DH Course Registry, and non-European participation in DARIAH Working Groups.The overall theme of the Library of Congress workshop was “Collections as Data,” building on a number of U.S.-based initiatives exploring how to enhance researcher engagement with digital collections through computationally-driven research. In Washington, D.C., the knowledge exchange sessions focussed on digitised newspapers and text analysis, infrastructural challenges for public humanities, and the use of web-archives in DH research. As at Stanford, interconnecting with DARIAH Working Groups was of core interest to participants, and a new Working Group was proposed to explore global access and use of digitised historical newspapers. A further important outcome was the agreement to explore collaboration between the U.S.-based “Collections as Data” initiatives and the Heritage Data Reuse Charter in Europe. The third and final workshop in the series took place in March 2019 in Australia, hosted by the National Library of Australia in Canberra. Convened by the Australian Academy of the Humanities (AAH), together with the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) and DARIAH, this event was co-located with the Academy’s second annual Humanities, Arts and Culture Data Summit. The first day of the event, targeted at research leadership and policy makers, was intended to explore new horizons for data-driven humanities and arts research, digital cultural collections and research infrastructure. The two subsequent days focused on engaging with a wide variety of communities, including (digital) humanities researchers and cultural heritage professionals. Organised around a series of Knowledge Exchange Sessions, combined with research-led lightning talks, the participants spoke in detail about how big ideas can be implemented practically on the ground. This poster reflects on the key outcomes and future directions arising from these three workshops, and considers what it might look like for DARIAH to be adopted as a fundamental DH infrastructure in a complex variety of international, national, and regional contexts, with diverse funding models, resources, needs, and expectations. One major outcome of all workshops was the shared recognition that, in spite of extensive funding, planning, and goodwill, these workshops were not nearly global enough in their reach: most importantly they were not inclusive of the Global South. Our new DARIAH beyond Europe community has a strong shared commitment to address this gap.

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    Authors: Boukhelifa , Nadia; Giannisakis , Emmanouil; Dimara , Evanthia; Willett , Wesley; +1 Authors

    International audience; In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of a visual analytics tool to support historical research. Historians continuously gather data related to their scholarly research from archival visits and background search. Organising and making sense of all this data can be challenging as many historians continue to rely on analog or basic digital tools. We built an integrated note-taking environment for historians which unifies a set of func-tionalities we identified as important for historical research including editing, tagging, searching, sharing and visualization. Our approach was to involve users from the initial stage of brainstorming and requirement analysis through to design, implementation and evaluation. We report on the process and results of our work, and conclude by reflecting on our own experience in conducting user-centered visual analytics design for digital humanities.

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    ProdInra
    Conference object . 2015
    License: CC BY SA
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  • Authors: Romary, Laurent; Puren, Marie;

    International audience; Le projet européen Iperion regroupe un ensemble d'acteurs européens offrant des services d'infrastructure pour l'étude du patrimoine matériel sous la forme d'équipements fixes ou mobiles. Ces différents services génèrent potentiellement de grandes quantités de données qu'il est nécessaire de gérer et documenter. En particulier, il semble utile de travailler à la constitution d'un réservoir de telles données qui soit consultable par une large communauté de chercheurs, notamment en sciences humaines. On peut ainsi penser au rôle que peuvent jouer des analyses précises d'une oeuvre pour un historien des arts qui souhaite étudier l'évolution de la technique d'un peintre par exemple. La mise en place d'une telle infrastructure de données réutilisables dans le domaine du patrimoine matériel se heurte cependant à plusieurs difficultés que nous essayons de réduire au sein du projet Iperion. Tout d'abord, il n'est pas nécessairement dans la culture du déploiement des équipements eux-mêmes d'envisager une réutilisation large des données. Le scénario de base est souvent celui d'un chercheur qui va conduire une analyse ciblée d'un objet patrimonial, pour ensuite exploiter lui-même les résultats correspondants et passer à l'analyse suivante, sans se préoccuper d'une réutilisation des données produites. Ensuite, du point de vue des formats de données, on observe l'absence de réels standards de représentation communs aux différents types d'équipements. On se retrouve ainsi à devoir gérer des données propriétaires qui dépendent principalement des constructeurs des équipements. Enfin, se posele problème complexe des droits d'utilisation qui combinent un ensemble de difficultés liées au statut des oeuvres elles-mêmes, aux règles régissant l'équipement, mais aussi à la volonté de partage du chercheur qui a effectué le recueil initial des données. Dans ce cadre, notre objectif est de mettre en place une démarche d'analyse de l'état des lieux et de proposition de principes communs de gestion des données au sein du projet. Il s'agirait ainsi de préfigurer une charte de gestion des données applicable à la future infrastructure européenne E-RIHS, en collaboration avec l'infrastructure numérique DARIAH en sciences humaines. Nous avons ainsi recueilli les réponses des différents partenaires du projet concernant à la fois les modes de gestion des équipements, et le statut des jeux de données disponibles. La variété des réponses obtenues montre déjà que seules des recommandations génériques pourront être produites à l'échelle européenne, et nous esquisserons quelques propositions dans ce sens. Laurent Romary est directeur de recherche à Inria où il mène des recherches dans le domaine des humanités numériques et plus particulièrement sur la modélisation et la représentation de données en sciences humaines et sociales. Depuis plusieurs années, il a contribué à la définition des politiques d'information scientifique du CNRS, de la société Max Planck et d'Inria, où il a contribué notamment à la définition d'une obligation de dépôt en archives ouvertes dans HAL. Il a aussi participé de longue date à la définition et à l'évolution des directives de la TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), notamment comme membre, mais aussi comme président du conseil technique de la TEI, et préside le comité 37 de l'ISO (Organisation international de normalisation). Il dirige l'infrastructure Européenne DARIAH pour le développement de méthodes numériques en sciences humaines et sociales. https://cv.archives-ouvertes.fr/laurentromary

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    Authors: Raciti, Marco; Gabay, Simon; Moranville, Yoann; Jorge, Maria Do Rosário; +1 Authors

    International audience; Europe has a long and rich tradition as a centre of research and teaching in the arts and humanities. However, the huge digital transformation that affects the arts and humanities research landscape all over the world requires that we set up sustainable research infrastructures, new and refined techniques, state-of-the-art methods and an expanded skills base. Responding to these challenges, the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) was launched as a pan-European network and research infrastructure. After expansion and consolidation, which involved DARIAH’s inclusion in the ESFRI roadmap, DARIAH became a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) in 2014. The Horizon 2020 funded project DESIR (DARIAH ERIC Sustainability Refined) sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and help establish it as a reliable long-term partner within our communities. Sustaining existing digital expertise, tools, resources in Europe in the context of DESIR involves a goal-oriented set of measures in order to first, maintain, expand and develop DARIAH in its capacities as an organisation and technical research infrastructure; secondly, to engage its members further, as well as measure and increase their trust in DARIAH; thirdly, to expand the network in order to integrate new regions and communities. The DESIR consortium is composed of core DARIAH members, representatives from potential new DARIAH members and external technical experts. The sustainability of a research infrastructure is the capacity to remain operative, effective and competitive over its expected lifetime. In DESIR, this definition is translated into an evolving 6-dimensional process, divided into the following challenges:•Dissemination•Growth•Technology•Robustness•Trust•EducationWith our poster, we would like to show how the project helps sustaining DARIAH. Within DESIR, dissemination is the ability to communicate DARIAH’s strategy and benefits effectively within the DARIAH community and in new areas, spreading out to new communities. Through the international workshops held at Stanford University and at the Library of Congress, DARIAH has been introduced to many non-European DH scholars. These events were an important first step to foster international cooperation between US and European colleagues as well as a catalyst for ongoing collaborations in the future. A third workshop took place in Canberra at the Australian Research Data Commons in March 2019.DARIAH has currently 17 members from all over Europe. Nevertheless, efforts should be made to include as many countries as possible to bring in and scale, to a European level, even more state-of-the-art DH activities.Six candidates ready for building strong national consortia have been identified, enabling a substantial expansion of DARIAH’s country coverage. Additionally, thematic workshops are organised in each country as well as tailored training measures.DESIR widens the research infrastructure in core areas which are vital for DARIAH’s sustainability but are not yet covered by the existing set-up. As DARIAH expands across Europe, continuously enhancing and further developing the ERIC exceeds DARIAH’s internal technological capacities. Two notable results were achieved so far: firstly, the publication of a technical reference as a result of a workshop organised in October 2017 with CESSDA and CLARIN. It’s a collection of basic guidelines and references for development and maintenance of infrastructure services within DARIAH and beyond, addressing an ongoing issue for research infrastructures, namely software sustainability. Secondly, the organisation of a Code Sprint, focusing on bibliographical and citation metadata, which helped shaping DARIAH’s profile in four technology areas (visualisation, text analytic services, entity-based search and scholarly content management). Another Code sprint is expected to take place in Summer 2019.Another output is the implementation of a centralized helpdesk. This helpdesk is hosted by CLARIN-D and the solution of integration within the existing DARIAH website was the creation of a WordPress plugin. This plugin is used to connect our website with the OTRS server and allows the creation of issues easily by users unfamiliar with OTRS.Sustaining a research infrastructure involves also two important aspects: trust and education. For DARIAH, it is crucial to increase trust and confidence from its users. In DESIR we develop recommendations and strategies accordingly, targeting new cross-disciplinary communities, based on the results of a survey and interviews addressed to the scientific community, with different levels of approach - national, institutional and individual.In addition, education is a key area and the project contributes to the ongoing discussions about the role and modalities of training and education in the development, consolidation and sustainability of digital research infrastructures. We believe that investing time and efforts into training and educating users is a way of securing the social sustainability of a research infrastructure.

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    Hyper Article en Ligne
    Other literature type . 2019
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    Authors: Scharnhorst, Andrea; Admiraal, Femmy; van Kranenburg, Peter; Guillotel-Nothmann, Christophe; +1 Authors

    This paper takes as an example the envisioned portal of the newly started Polifonia project that interlinks resources from very rich, old, established archives while making optimal use of the latest semantic web technologies. In the project, ten research pilots, spanning from historical bells and organ heritage, classification of polyphonic notated music, to the historical role of music in children's lives, form the driving force behind the development of the dedicated interface. Based on a mixture of participation and participatory observation, we describe and reflect on the processes involved in making the portal. In other words - exemplified with the case of Polifonia - we reflect on the role of interfaces (of various types, shapes, manifestations and/or durations) to organise knowledge in an interdisciplinary project. In particular, we focus on the role of data management within the project as a key component of research methodology and cross-disciplinary collaboration, rather than an administrative exercise. The knowledge generated by this part of the project serves at least three different purposes: (1) to envision new research questions (competence questions) guiding the engineering backbone processes; (2) to define the future elements of the portal both for experts, other researchers, wider public and specific parts of the wider public; and last but not least, (3) the documentation task needed to support reproducibility and FAIRness of all data processes. Figure 1 below illustrates how the three components, namely the sociotechnical roadmap of the portal, the ontology-based knowledge graphs created in the research pilots, and the data management plan form three complementary components of the Polifonia project, that ultimately all feed into the web portal. In this paper, we claim that behind any interface there is the need for a layer of interfaces that form the basis of the final interface visible to the public. These procedural, intermediary, interfaces take the form of meetings, shared notes, github presence - and will result in products of their own (Data Management Plan, knowledge graphs), as well as inform the decisions during the process of designing the portal.

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    Presentation . 2021
    License: CC BY
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    ZENODO
    Other literature type . 2021
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    Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
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  • Authors: Romary, Laurent; Biabiany, Damien; Illmayer, Klaus; Puren, Marie; +3 Authors

    International audience