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59 Research products, page 1 of 6

  • DARIAH EU
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2017-2021
  • Conference object
  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Blandine Nouvel; Evelyne Sinigaglia; Véronique Humbert;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The aim of the talk is to present the methodology used to reorganise the PACTOLS thesaurus of Frantiq, launched within the framework of the MASA consortium. PACTOLS is a multilingual and open repository about archaeology from Prehistory to the present and for Classics. It is organized into six micro-thesaurus at the root of its name (Peuples, Anthroponymes,Chronologie, Toponymes, Oeuvres, Lieux, Sujets). The goal is to turn it into a tool interoperable with information systems beyond its original documentary purpose, and usable by archaeologists as a repository for managing scientific data. During the talk, we will describe the choice of tools, the organisation of work within the steering group and the collaborations with specialists for the upgrading and development of the vocabulary while showing the strengths and limitations of some experiments. Above allit will show how the introduction of the conceptual categories of the BackBone Thesaurus of DARIAH, modelled on the CIDOC-CRM ontology, through a progressive deconstruction/reconstruction process, eventually had an impact on all micro thesauri and questioned the organisation of knowledge so far proposed.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Bornhofen; Marten Düring;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: ANR | BLIZAAR (ANR-15-CE23-0002)

    AbstractThe paper presents Intergraph, a graph-based visual analytics technical demonstrator for the exploration and study of content in historical document collections. The designed prototype is motivated by a practical use case on a corpus of circa 15.000 digitized resources about European integration since 1945. The corpus allowed generating a dynamic multilayer network which represents different kinds of named entities appearing and co-appearing in the collections. To our knowledge, Intergraph is one of the first interactive tools to visualize dynamic multilayer graphs for collections of digitized historical sources. Graph visualization and interaction methods have been designed based on user requirements for content exploration by non-technical users without a strong background in network science, and to compensate for common flaws with the annotation of named entities. Users work with self-selected subsets of the overall data by interacting with a scene of small graphs which can be added, altered and compared. This allows an interest-driven navigation in the corpus and the discovery of the interconnections of its entities across time.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamé, M.; Pittet, P.; Federico Ponchio; Markhoff, B.; Sanfilippo, E. M.;
    Countries: France, Italy

    International audience; In this paper, we present an online communication-driven decision support system to align terms from a dataset with terms of another dataset (standardized controlled vocabulary or not). Heterotoki differs from existing proposals in that it takes place at the interface with humans, inviting the experts to commit on their definitions, so as to either agree to validate the mapping or to propose some enrichment to the terminologies. More precisely, differently to most of existing proposals that support terminology alignment, Heterotoki sustains the negotiation of meaning thanks to semantic coordination support within its interface design. This negotiation involves domain experts having produced multiple datasets.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanden Daelen, Veerle; Drenth, Petra;
    Project: EC | EHRI (654164)

    International audience; The mission of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) is to support the Holocaust research community by building a digital infrastructure and facilitating human networks. EHRI provides online access to information about dispersed sources relating to the Holocaust through its Online Portal, and tools and methods that enable researchers and archivists to collaboratively work with such sources. Apart from providing an online platform, EHRI also facilitates an extensive network of researchers, archivists and others to increase cohesion and co-ordination among practitioners and to initiate new transnational and collaborative approaches to the study of the Holocaust. EHRI thereby seeks to overcome one of the hallmark challenges of Holocaust research: the wide dispersal of the archival source material across Europe and beyond, and the concomitant fragmentation of Holocaust historiography. More than twenty organisations – research institutions, libraries, archives, museums and memorial sites – from 17 countries form a core working group, but EHRI equally relies on the support of many other individuals and organisations in the broad fields of Holocaust studies and digital humanities. With a poster presentation at the DARIAH-EU Annual Event 2017 in Berlin, the authors would like to present the resources and services EHRI has to offer to the research community, with a special emphasis on the EHRI Portal. The EHRI portal offers access to information on Holocaust-related archival material held in institutions across Europe and beyond. You can browse 57 country reports, 1,938 archival institutions in 51 countries, and 231,478 archival descriptions in 472 institutions (April 2017). Other EHRI resources and training include: Online Training in Holocaust Studies; Seminars and Workshops; Fellowship Programme; Conferences; Online Document Blog; Online Research Guides; and Tools and Methods for Digital History. Two features were highlighted: The relatively new EHRI Document Blog, and the successful EHRI Fellowships. The EHRI Document Blog is a space to share ideas about Holocaust-related archival documents, and their presentation and interpretation, using digital tools. The EHRI Fellowships support and stimulate Holocaust research by facilitating international access to key archives and collections as well as archival and digital humanities knowhow. The fellowships intend to support researchers, archivists, curators, and younger scholars. By bringing together experts from different fields, and by building an innovative digital infrastructure supported by a large community, EHRI is a flagship project that showcases the opportunities for historical research in the digital age. EHRI started its work in October 2010 with initial financial support from the European Union for four years. Thanks to the continued EU support, EHRI keeps on developing. EHRI is devoted to building a Holocaust research infrastructure that is sustained by its network and will have a right of existence on its own accord.https://portal.ehri-project.eu/www.ehri-project.eu

  • Publication . Conference object . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Bassett, Sheena; Wessels, Leon; Krauwer, Steven; Maegaard, Bente; Hollander, Hella; Admiraal, Femmy; Romary, Laurent; Uiterwaal, Frank;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    International audience; Several Research Infrastructures(RIs)exist in the Humanities and Social Sciences, some –such as CLARIN, DARIAH and CESSDA –which address specific areas of interest, i.e. linguistic studies, digital humanities and social science data archives. RIs are also unique in their scope and application, largely tailored to their specific community needs. However, commonalities do exist and it is recognised that benefits are to be gained from these such as efficient use of resources, enabling multi-disciplinary research and sharing good practices. As such,a bridging project PARTHENOS has worked closely with CLARIN and DARIAH as well as ARIADNE (archaeology), CENDARI (history), EHRI (holocaust studies) and E-RIHS (heritage science) to iden-tify, develop and promote these commonalities. In this paper, we present some specif-ic examples of cross-discipline and trans-border applications arising from joint RI collaboration, allowing for entirely new avenues of research

  • French
    Authors: 
    Renault, Stéphane; Nouvel, Blandine;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; Access to primary data, particularly in archaeology and archaeosciences, remains limited. However, this question is a major issue in scientific research. The Laboratoire méditerranéen de préhistoire Europe-Afrique (LaMPEA-UMR 7269), within the network of archaeology laboratories in the Aix Marseille University area, is developing a collaborative and interdisciplinary digital platform ArcaDIIS (Archaeological Data Infrastructure for Interoperability and Sharing), for the interoperability and sharing of archaeology data and related disciplines, particularly in the fields of the environment, archaeometry, life sciences and health. Adopting semantic web technologies, international interoperability standards and specialized disciplinary vocabularies, this platform aims to meet the needs of qualitative resource management. It proposes the editorialization and enhancement of data sets, with a view to sustainability, accessibility and reuse. It also plans to host documentation and modelling resources in specific formats and evaluated publications, whether related to the data sets on ArcaDIIS or produced independently throughout the life cycle of a research project/program.Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator; L'accès aux données primaires, particulièrement en archéologie et en archéosciences, reste encore limité. Cette question est pourtant un enjeu majeur de la recherche scientifique. Le Laboratoire méditerranéen de préhistoire Europe-Afrique (LaMPEA-UMR 7269), au sein du réseau des laboratoires d'archéologie du périmètre d'Aix Marseille Université, porte le développement d'une plateforme numérique collaborative et interdisciplinaire ArcaDIIS (Archaeological Data Infrastructure for Interoperability and Sharing), pour l'interopérabilité et le partage des données de l'archéologie et des disciplines qui y sont rattachées, notamment dans les domaines de l'environnement, de l'archéométrie, des sciences de la vie et de la santé. Adoptant les technologies du web sémantique, les standards internationaux d'interopérabilité et les vocabulaires spécialisés de disciplines, cette plateforme entend répondre aux besoins en gestion qualitative de ressources. Elle propose l'éditorialisation et la valorisation des jeux de données, dans une perspective de pérennisation, d'accessibilité et de réutilisation. Elle envisage en outre d'accueillir des ressources documentaires et de modélisation aux formats spécifiques et des publications évaluées, qu'elles soient liées aux jeux de données versés sur ArcaDIIS ou produites indépendamment tout au long du cycle de vie d'un projet/programme de recherche.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Marlet , Olivier; Francart, Thomas; Markhoff, Béatrice; Rodier, Xavier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    International audience; CIDOC CRM is an ontology intended to facilitate the integration, mediation and interchange of heterogeneous cultural heritage information. The Semantic Web with its Linked Open Data cloud enables scholars and cultural institutions to publish their data in RDF, using CIDOC CRM as an interlingua that enables a semantically consistent re-interpretation of their data. Nowadays more and more projects have done the task of mapping legacy datasets to CIDOC CRM, and successful Extract-Transform-Load data-integration processes have been performed in this way. A next step is enabling people and applications to actually dynamically explore autonomous datasets using the semantic mediation offered by CIDOC CRM. This is the purpose of OpenArchaeo, a tool for querying archaeological datasets on the LOD cloud. We present its main features: the principles behind its user friendly query interface and its SPARQL Endpoint for programs, together with its overall architecture designed to be extendable and scalable, for handling transparent interconnections with evolving distributed sources while achieving good efficiency.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Chambers, Sally; Deroo, Katrien; Wout, Dillen; Dozo, Björn-Olav; Gheldof, Tom; Kestemont, Mike;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; Digital Humanities is thriving in Belgium. As a Founding Member of DARIAH-EU, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, our aim is to offer a sustainable portfolio of services enabling digital scholarship in the arts and humanities. To realise this DARIAH partner institutions are encouraged to establish Digital Humanities Research Centres which together form a humanities-specific digital ecosystem, offering services both within their own institutions and to other institutions in Belgium and beyond. This poster presents four DH centres in Belgium: three existing centres; the Centre Informatique de Philosophie et Lettres (CIPL, Université de Liège), the University of Antwerp’s Platform for Digital Humanities (platform{DH}, UA) and the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities (GhentCDH, Ghent University) plus the Leuven Centre for Digital Humanities (LCDH, KU Leuven) which is currently being established. Finally, we share our experiences and lessons learned from establishing digital humanities centres in our own institutions and interconnecting them via the DARIAH network.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Chambers, Sally; Deroo, Katrien; Wout, Dillen; Dozo, Björn-Olav; Gheldof, Tom; Kestemont, Mike;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Digital Humanities is thriving in Belgium. As a Founding Member of DARIAH-EU, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, our aim is to offer a sustainable portfolio of services enabling digital scholarship in the arts and humanities. To realise this DARIAH partner institutions are encouraged to establish Digital Humanities Research Centres which together form a humanities-specific digital ecosystem, offering services both within their own institutions and to other institutions in Belgium and beyond. This poster presents four DH centres in Belgium: three existing centres; the Centre Informatique de Philosophie et Lettres (CIPL, Université de Liège), the University of Antwerp’s Platform for Digital Humanities (platform{DH}, UA) and the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities (GhentCDH, Ghent University) plus the Leuven Centre for Digital Humanities (LCDH, KU Leuven) which is currently being established. Finally, we share our experiences and lessons learned from establishing digital humanities centres in our own institutions and interconnecting them via the DARIAH network.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Romary, Laurent; Biabiany, Damien; Klaus Illmayer; Puren, Marie; Riondet, Charles; Seillier, Dorian; Tadjou, Lionel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    International audience