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75 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • DARIAH EU
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  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nispen, van, Annelies;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Bornhofen; Marten Düring;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: ANR | BLIZAAR (ANR-15-CE23-0002)

    AbstractThe paper presents Intergraph, a graph-based visual analytics technical demonstrator for the exploration and study of content in historical document collections. The designed prototype is motivated by a practical use case on a corpus of circa 15.000 digitized resources about European integration since 1945. The corpus allowed generating a dynamic multilayer network which represents different kinds of named entities appearing and co-appearing in the collections. To our knowledge, Intergraph is one of the first interactive tools to visualize dynamic multilayer graphs for collections of digitized historical sources. Graph visualization and interaction methods have been designed based on user requirements for content exploration by non-technical users without a strong background in network science, and to compensate for common flaws with the annotation of named entities. Users work with self-selected subsets of the overall data by interacting with a scene of small graphs which can be added, altered and compared. This allows an interest-driven navigation in the corpus and the discovery of the interconnections of its entities across time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Der Eycken, Johan; Styven, Dorien; Gheldof, Tom; Depoortere, Rolande;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Belgium

    This article shows that metadata plays a central role in our society and concludes that through collaborative work, it is possible to pool solutions and to establish relationships of cooperation, both at the level of practical tool development and with regard to sharing and creating knowledge and know-how. ispartof: ABB: Archives et Bibliothèques de Belgique - Archief- en Bibliotheekwezen in België vol:106 pages:135-144 status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Ruijter, Eric;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamé, M.; Pittet, P.; Federico Ponchio; Markhoff, B.; Sanfilippo, E. M.;
    Countries: France, Italy

    International audience; In this paper, we present an online communication-driven decision support system to align terms from a dataset with terms of another dataset (standardized controlled vocabulary or not). Heterotoki differs from existing proposals in that it takes place at the interface with humans, inviting the experts to commit on their definitions, so as to either agree to validate the mapping or to propose some enrichment to the terminologies. More precisely, differently to most of existing proposals that support terminology alignment, Heterotoki sustains the negotiation of meaning thanks to semantic coordination support within its interface design. This negotiation involves domain experts having produced multiple datasets.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2019 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rizza, Ettore; Chardonnens, Anne; Van Hooland, Seth;
    Publisher: arXiv
    Countries: France, Belgium

    More and more cultural institutions use Linked Data principles to share and connect their collection metadata. In the archival field, initiatives emerge to exploit data contained in archival descriptions and adapt encoding standards to the semantic web. In this context, online authority files can be used to enrich metadata. However, relying on a decentralized network of knowledge bases such as Wikidata, DBpedia or even Viaf has its own difficulties. This paper aims to offer a critical view of these linked authority files by adopting a close-reading approach. Through a practical case study, we intend to identify and illustrate the possibilities and limits of RDF triples compared to institutions' less structured metadata. Comment: Workshop "Dariah "Trust and Understanding: the value of metadata in a digitally joined-up world" (14/05/2018, Brussels), preprint of the submission to the journal "Archives et Biblioth\`eques de Belgique"

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Reinhard Altenhöner; Ina Blümel; Franziska Boehm; Jens Bove; Katrin Bicher; Christian Bracht; Ortrun Brand; Lisa Dieckmann; Maria Effinger; Malte Hagener; +15 more
    Publisher: Pensoft Publishers
    Country: Germany

    Digital data on tangible and intangible cultural assets is an essential part of daily life, communication and experience. It has a lasting influence on the perception of cultural identity as well as on the interactions between research, the cultural economy and society. Throughout the last three decades, many cultural heritage institutions have contributed a wealth of digital representations of cultural assets (2D digital reproductions of paintings, sheet music, 3D digital models of sculptures, monuments, rooms, buildings), audio-visual data (music, film, stage performances), and procedural research data such as encoding and annotation formats. The long-term preservation and FAIR availability of research data from the cultural heritage domain is fundamentally important, not only for future academic success in the humanities but also for the cultural identity of individuals and society as a whole. Up to now, no coordinated effort for professional research data management on a national level exists in Germany. NFDI4Culture aims to fill this gap and create a user-centered, research-driven infrastructure that will cover a broad range of research domains from musicology, art history and architecture to performance, theatre, film, and media studies. The research landscape addressed by the consortium is characterized by strong institutional differentiation. Research units in the consortium's community of interest comprise university institutes, art colleges, academies, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. This diverse landscape is also characterized by an abundance of research objects, methodologies and a great potential for data-driven research. In a unique effort carried out by the applicant and co-applicants of this proposal and ten academic societies, this community is interconnected for the first time through a federated approach that is ideally suited to the needs of the participating researchers. To promote collaboration within the NFDI, to share knowledge and technology and to provide extensive support for its users have been the guiding principles of the consortium from the beginning and will be at the heart of all workflows and decision-making processes. Thanks to these principles, NFDI4Culture has gathered strong support ranging from individual researchers to high-level cultural heritage organizations such as the UNESCO, the International Council of Museums, the Open Knowledge Foundation and Wikimedia. On this basis, NFDI4Culture will take innovative measures that promote a cultural change towards a more reflective and sustainable handling of research data and at the same time boost qualification and professionalization in data-driven research in the domain of cultural heritage. This will create a long-lasting impact on science, cultural economy and society as a whole.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • Publication . Presentation . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access

    Slides presented at the EADH conference in Galway, 09.12.2018. OpenMethods (https://openmethods.dariah.eu) is a metablog aimed at republishing and bringing together all sorts of Open Access publications (e.g. research articles, preprints, blogs, videos, podcasts) about Digital Humanities methods and tools to spread the knowledge and raise peer recognition for them. The has been developed in the supervision of the DARIAH community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.