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17 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • DARIAH EU
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Open Access
  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • English

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  • Publication . Other literature type . Preprint . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Miriam Baglioni; Alessia Bardi; Argiro Kokogiannaki; Paolo Manghi; Katerina Iatropoulou; Pedro Príncipe; André Vieira; Lars Holm Nielsen; Harry Dimitropoulos; Ioannis Foufoulas; +7 more
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing, CH-6330 Cham (ZG), CHE
    Countries: Italy, Portugal, Portugal
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011), WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011)

    Despite the hype, the effective implementation of Open Science is hindered by several cultural and technical barriers. Researchers embraced digital science, use “digital laboratories” (e.g. research infrastructures, thematic services) to conduct their research and publish research data, but practices and tools are still far from achieving the expectations of transparency and reproducibility of Open Science. The places where science is performed and the places where science is published are still regarded as different realms. Publishing is still a post-experimental, tedious, manual process, too often limited to articles, in some contexts semantically linked to datasets, rarely to software, generally disregarding digital representations of experiments. In this work we present the OpenAIRE Research Community Dashboard (RCD), designed to overcome some of these barriers for a given research community, minimizing the technical efforts and without renouncing any of the community services or practices. The RCD flanks digital laboratories of research communities with scholarly communication tools for discovering and publishing interlinked scientific products such as literature, datasets, and software. The benefits of the RCD are show-cased by means of two real-case scenarios: the European Marine Science community and the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) research infrastructure. This work is partly funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance H2020 project (grant number: 777541; call: H2020-EINFRA-2017) and the OpenAIREConnect H2020 project (grant number: 731011; call: H2020-EINFRA-2016-1). Moreover, we would like to thank our colleagues Michele Manunta, Francesco Casu, and Claudio De Luca (Institute for the Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, CNR, Italy) for their work on the EPOS infrastructure RCD; and Stephane Pesant (University of Bremen, Germany) his work on the European Marine Science RCD. First Online 30 August 2019

  • Publication . Other literature type . Part of book or chapter of book . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, Arjan; Tjalsma, Heiko; Priddy, Mike; Meier zu Verl, Christian; Horstmann, Wolfram;
    Publisher: Universitätsbibliothek Bielefeld
    Country: Germany

    The social sciences and the humanities taken together contain a heterogeneous range of research disciplines. Almost all existing methods of research can be found within these two domains. Data handling (collecting, processing, selecting, preserving) and publication methods differ greatly. Attitudes in the field towards Open Access of publications as well to research data vary as well. It is not possible to cover the total fullness, and complexity, of all the disciplines within these two domains. Our observations will therefore be based upon a number of case studies. Taken together these case studies give a fairly representative picture of the domains, at least of the most common research environments. The main dividing line is between those disciplines creating empirical data, such as survey data in the social sciences and those, especially in the humanities, using existing source material, such as history or text studies. This source material can either be of an analogous or a digital nature. As will be shown in the case studies in many disciplines a mix of created and existing is often combined.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hughes, Lorna;
    Publisher: Sapienza Università Editrice
    Country: United Kingdom

    No abstract available.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dillo, I.; van Horik, M.P.M.; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Bolikowski, Łukasz; Casarosa, Vittore; Goodale, Paula; Houssos, Nikos; Manghi, Paolo; Schirrwagen, Jochen;
    Country: Netherlands

    The increasing volume and importance of research data leads to the emergence of research data infrastructures in which data management plays an important role. As a consequence, practices at digital archives and libraries change. In this paper, we focus on a possible alliance between archives and libraries around training activities in data curation. We introduce a so-called FrontOffice–BackOffice model and discuss experiences of its implementation in the Netherlands. In this model, an efficient division of tasks relies on a distributed infrastructure in which research institutions (i.e., universities) use centralized storage and data curation services provided by national research data archives. The training activities are aimed at information professionals working at those research institutions, for instance as digital librarians. We describe our experiences with the course DataIntelligence4Librarians. Eventually, we reflect about the international dimension of education and training around data curation and stewardship.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zeldenrust, D.A.; Kemps-Snijders, M.; Zeeman, R.H.M.; van Zundert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Jorna, R.; Kechen, Liu; Faber, N.R.;
    Publisher: Fryske Akademy
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hollander, H.S.;
    Publisher: Stadt Archäologie Wien

    In the Netherlands, the archiving and publication of archaeological research data has led to the establishment of the e-Depot for Dutch Archaeology (EDNA) accommodated at DANS. EDNA is a collaboration between DANS and the Cultural Heritage Agency (RCE). DANS is an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The slogan "Digital archaeology requires a digital memory" was used in 2007 to bring care for digital data to the attention of Dutch archaeologists. The e-depot ensures durable archiving and unlocking of all digital documentation of the archaeological research. By 2014, DANS provides online access via EASY to more than 21,500 archaeological datasets: 18,500 reports and 3,000 large datasets consisting of data of excavations and explorations (photos, GIS, data-tables, drawings). Both the research descriptions and all data can be downloaded. Agreements to this end have been laid down in the quality standard for Dutch archaeology. DANS ensures that access to digital research data keeps improving, through its services and by taking part in national and international projects and networks. By participating in projects such as Odyssee, CARARE, ARIADNE and DARIAH, the options for finding, accessing and re-using archaeological and other data are continuously improving. DANS stimulates cooperation between data producers and users and does research into long-term accessibility. The existing infrastructure of the e-depot for Dutch Archaeology allows for sharing of good practices such as long-term preservation, data organisation and data dissemination for accessibility.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Laurent Romary; Conny Kristel; Tobias Blanke;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Humanities have convincingly argued that they need transnational research opportunities and through the digital transformation of their disciplines also have the means to proceed with it on an up to now unknown scale. The digital transformation of research and its resources means that many of the artifacts, documents, materials, etc. that interest humanities research can now be combined in new and innovative ways. Due to the digital transformations, (big) data and information have become central to the study of culture and society. Humanities research infrastructures manage, organise and distribute this kind of information and many more data objects as they becomes relevant for social and cultural research.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dijk, E.M.S.; Doorn, P.K.;
    Publisher: National Library of Technology

    Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data in the Netherlands. Researchers can deposit their data through the online archiving system EASY. Via the portal NARCIS the research data are shown in context, namely in relation to publications, and other research information. Both EASY and NARCIS contain grey literature like archaeological reports, data documentation, doctoral thesis, conference papers, patents, and technical documentation of universities and other research institutes.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elisa Nury;
    Country: Switzerland

    International audience; This paper describes the workflow of the Grammateus project, from gathering data on Greek documentary papyri to the creation of a web application. The first stage is the selection of a corpus and the choice of metadata to record: papyrology specialists gather data from printed editions, existing online resources and digital facsimiles. In the next step, this data is transformed into the EpiDoc standard of XML TEI encoding, to facilitate its reuse by others, and processed for HTML display. We also reuse existing text transcriptions available on . Since these transcriptions may be regularly updated by the scholarly community, we aim to access them dynamically. Although the transcriptions follow the EpiDoc guidelines, the wide diversity of the papyri as well as small inconsistencies in encoding make data reuse challenging. Currently, our data is available on an institutional GitLab repository, and we will archive our final dataset according to the FAIR principles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barker, Elton; Isaksen, Leif; Rabinowitz, Nick; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Pelling, Chris;
    Publisher: Institute of Classical Studies, University of London

    Involving the collaboration of researchers from Classics, Geography and Archaeological Computing, and supported by funding from the AHRC, HESTIA (the Herodotus Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive) aims to enrich contemporary discussions of space by developing an innovative methodology for the study of an ancient narrative, Herodotus’s Histories. Using the latest digital technology in combination with close textual study, we investigate the geographical concepts through which Herodotus describes the conflict between Greeks and Persians. Our findings nuance the customary topographical vision of an east versus west polarity by drawing attention to the topological network culture that criss-crosses the two, and develop the means of bringing that world to a mass audience via the internet. In this paper we discuss three main aspects to the project: the data capture of place-names in Herodotus; their visualization and dissemination using the web-mapping technologies of GIS, Google Earth and Timemap; and the interrogation of the relationships that Herodotus draws between different geographical concepts using the digital resources at our disposal. Our concern will be to set out in some detail the digital basis to our methodology and the technologies that we have been exploiting, as well as the problems that we have encountered, in the hope of contributing not only to a more complex picture of space in Herodotus but also to a basis for future digital projects across the Humanities that spatially visualize large text-based corpora. With this in mind we end with a brief discussion of some of the ways in which this study is being developed, with assistance from research grants from the Google Digital Humanities Awards Program and JISC.