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18 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • DARIAH EU
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Conference object
  • DARIAH EU
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Publication . Article . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Bornhofen; Marten Düring;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: ANR | BLIZAAR (ANR-15-CE23-0002)

    AbstractThe paper presents Intergraph, a graph-based visual analytics technical demonstrator for the exploration and study of content in historical document collections. The designed prototype is motivated by a practical use case on a corpus of circa 15.000 digitized resources about European integration since 1945. The corpus allowed generating a dynamic multilayer network which represents different kinds of named entities appearing and co-appearing in the collections. To our knowledge, Intergraph is one of the first interactive tools to visualize dynamic multilayer graphs for collections of digitized historical sources. Graph visualization and interaction methods have been designed based on user requirements for content exploration by non-technical users without a strong background in network science, and to compensate for common flaws with the annotation of named entities. Users work with self-selected subsets of the overall data by interacting with a scene of small graphs which can be added, altered and compared. This allows an interest-driven navigation in the corpus and the discovery of the interconnections of its entities across time.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamé, M.; Pittet, P.; Federico Ponchio; Markhoff, B.; Sanfilippo, E. M.;
    Countries: France, Italy

    International audience; In this paper, we present an online communication-driven decision support system to align terms from a dataset with terms of another dataset (standardized controlled vocabulary or not). Heterotoki differs from existing proposals in that it takes place at the interface with humans, inviting the experts to commit on their definitions, so as to either agree to validate the mapping or to propose some enrichment to the terminologies. More precisely, differently to most of existing proposals that support terminology alignment, Heterotoki sustains the negotiation of meaning thanks to semantic coordination support within its interface design. This negotiation involves domain experts having produced multiple datasets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ivan Kratchanov;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The National Library Ivan Vazov in Plovdiv is the second largest library in Bulgaria. It serves asthe second national legal depository of Bulgarian printed works. In addition, it has contributedsignificantly to the preservation and the digital accessibility of the national cultural andhistorical heritage. This article offers an overview of the library’s history and currentdevelopments in the field of automation and digitization.

  • Publication . Presentation . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access

    Slides presented at the EADH conference in Galway, 09.12.2018. OpenMethods (https://openmethods.dariah.eu) is a metablog aimed at republishing and bringing together all sorts of Open Access publications (e.g. research articles, preprints, blogs, videos, podcasts) about Digital Humanities methods and tools to spread the knowledge and raise peer recognition for them. The has been developed in the supervision of the DARIAH community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adeline Joffres; Mike Priddy; Francesca Morselli; Thomas Lebarbé; Xavier Granier; Paul Bertrand; Xavier Rodier; Fabrice Melka; Jason Camlot; Stéfan Sinclair; +17 more
    Country: France

    International audience; Knowledge production has always act globally, and when it comes to the humanities early networks of scholars can still be traced in their letter correspondence. With the emergence of digital humanities more prominently in the 1970s, research communities have organized themselves in many different ways. The enthusiasm generated by the promises of what was sometimes perceived as a "new field" were to some extent echoed in new forms of institutionalization, to the point of defining a discipline in its own right. But the enthusiasms was also accompanied by a certain resistance of communities reluctant to introduce digital technology into their field.The term of "digital humanities" in these earlier days of adopting digital methods into the humanities created an area, a niche, inside which pioneers in Digital Humanities could gain critical mass. Today, where digital methods are far more widely applied, one can observe an almost opposite trend, the abandoning of a ‘specific label’ and a much broader advocacy concerning all humanities.What remains specific for DH communities is the close alliance between content providers (which themselves are in a process of digitisation content and access), humanities scholars applying digital methods, and computer scientists linking to new methodological achievements in their field. However, this alliance can express itself in very different forms of national and international organisation, and is far from following a specific model.This panel examines different ways of "forming a community" among digital humanities scholars and scholars in other fields, and other actors in DH. The contributions span a range from generic ways to design digital research infrastructures in the SSH, over national solutions to supranational coordination.The purpose of this panel is to unfold the diversity of the current "digital humanist movement”, not only to compare, but also to understand what is at stake for the actors involved and what impact the different forms of organisation have on creation and evolution of research communities. We further discuss issues of cohesion and durability. Through the papers presented, we will examine the impact of bottom-up, top-down and horizontal strategies as well as the adoption of hybrid solutions (organizational, disciplinary, methodological, scalar) in the design of research communities. This approach will allow us to put convergences and challenges into perspective and to question the re- compositions at work within SSH communities.This panel will highlight the experiences of SSH research communities from different cultures and organizations rooted at different levels of governance, such as some French communities structured around institutional nodes such as Maisons des Sciences de l'Homme (MSH), or research infrastructures at the national (TGIR Huma-Num) or European level (DARIAH ERIC); project based collaboration of research infrastructures (DANS, The Netherlands) and Canada (CRIHN); and professional networks and transnational associations related to digital humanities (e.g. Humanistica, the French-speaking association of digital humanities, or the Latin American network for digital humanities under construction). The comparison of the experiences presented will not produce a homogeneous and smooth image but will highlight differences in approaches and organisation. Even it seems nearly impossible to give account of every association that could be representative on a way to build community in DH, the chair of the session will make an introduction with a brief summary of this landscape. That said, besides the geographical aspect that we try to include, another is that we are giving voice to formal and informal associations such as the LatamHD network, that is just at an early stage and that is not yet defined in its goals. We decided to propose several solutions to deal with the diversity of needs and practises inside our communities and we wanted to present some of them to share our experiences and initiate discussions during this panel in order to develop collaborations with colleagues sharing the same kind of constraints.Thus, the objective is to have a broad discussion with the audience to broaden the perspectives to other experiences.This panel aims to contribute to the reflective work in the wider DH context about factors of constitution, consolidation and evolution of its research communities.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilia Simeonova; Kiril Simov; Petya Osenova; Preslav Nakov;

    We propose a morphologically informed model for named entity recognition, which is based on LSTM-CRF architecture and combines word embeddings, Bi-LSTM character embeddings, part-of-speech (POS) tags, and morphological information. While previous work has focused on learning from raw word input, using word and character embeddings only, we show that for morphologically rich languages, such as Bulgarian, access to POS information contributes more to the performance gains than the detailed morphological information. Thus, we show that named entity recognition needs only coarse-grained POS tags, but at the same time it can benefit from simultaneously using some POS information of different granularity. Our evaluation results over a standard dataset show sizable improvements over the state-of-the-art for Bulgarian NER. named entity recognition; Bulgarian NER; morphology; morpho-syntax

  • Publication . Preprint . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rehm, Georg; Marheinecke, Katrin; Hegele, Stefanie; Piperidis, Stelios; Bontcheva, Kalina; Hajic, Jan; Choukri, Khalid; Vasiljevs, Andrejs; Backfried, Gerhard; Prinz, Christoph; +37 more
    Countries: France, Denmark, France
    Project: SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106), EC | BDVe (732630), EC | ELG (825627), EC | AI4EU (825619), FCT | PINFRA/22117/2016 (PINFRA/22117/2016), EC | X5gon (761758), SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106), EC | BDVe (732630), EC | ELG (825627), EC | AI4EU (825619),...

    Multilingualism is a cultural cornerstone of Europe and firmly anchored in the European treaties including full language equality. However, language barriers impacting business, cross-lingual and cross-cultural communication are still omnipresent. Language Technologies (LTs) are a powerful means to break down these barriers. While the last decade has seen various initiatives that created a multitude of approaches and technologies tailored to Europe's specific needs, there is still an immense level of fragmentation. At the same time, AI has become an increasingly important concept in the European Information and Communication Technology area. For a few years now, AI, including many opportunities, synergies but also misconceptions, has been overshadowing every other topic. We present an overview of the European LT landscape, describing funding programmes, activities, actions and challenges in the different countries with regard to LT, including the current state of play in industry and the LT market. We present a brief overview of the main LT-related activities on the EU level in the last ten years and develop strategic guidance with regard to four key dimensions. Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference (LREC 2020). To appear

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gianpiero Alfarano; Erika Lascialfari;
    Publisher: Firenze University Press
    Country: Italy
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Maietti, Federica; Piaia, Emanuele; Mincolelli, Giuseppe; Di Giulio, Roberto; Imbesi, Silvia; Marchi, Michele; Giacobone, Gian Andrea; Brunoro, Silvia;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | INCEPTION (665220)

    The interdisciplinary EU funded project INCEPTION – Inclusive Cultural Heritage in Europe through 3D semantic modelling, coordinated by the Department of Architecture of the University of Ferrara, is focused on bringing together innovative 3D modelling and ICT applications and professionals involved in different fields of Cultural Heritage. The aim is to increase knowledge, enhancement and dissemination through 3D digital models in order to promote the inclusiveness and accessibility of European assets. In this direction, a Stakeholder Panel with different skills in the field of Cultural Heritage has been involved leading the research toward effective strategies to increase use and reuse of digital models. These strategies are aimed at maximizing the impact of using digital data for cultural heritage applications involving a wide range of non-expert and expert users, starting from specific requirements for processing, managing, delivering cultural heritage information to a broad audience. A co-design workshop has been organized involving Stakeholders in order to investigate on their requirements and expectations, to obtain information that could be useful for the User Centered process of definition of INCEPTION’s main outcomes and functionalities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Paola Puma;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Italy

    Here we address the roadmap of the Digital Cultural Heritage research group DigitCH group, which was set up in 2013 at the Department of Architecture, University of Florence. The aim of DigitCH group was to realize the link between scientifically validated methodologies and contents, innovative storytelling, and technological instrumentation. The spread of electronic devices has enabled rapid and easy technological fallout of research in the field of the acquisition-representation of the survey data expanding audiences and accelerating even an innovative approach to the whole knowledge of CH.