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4 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2017-2021
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • Other literature type
  • AT
  • DARIAH EU

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Florian Windhager; Saminu Salisu; Günther Schreder; Eva Mayr;
    Publisher: Open Library of Humanities
    Project: FWF | Towards Integrated Mental... (P 28363)

    In addition to providing pleasant and stimulating experiences, complex cultural collections can require significant amounts of cognitive work on the part of visitors. Whether collections are situated in physical spaces or presented via web-based interfaces, the sheer richness and diversity of artefacts and their associated information can frequently lead to cognitive overload and fatigue. In this article we explore visualization methods that can be used to fend off fatigue and to support cognitive tasks such as collection exploration and conceptual comprehension. We discuss a variety of options to generate collection representations with multiple views and focus on the rarely heeded challenge of how to integrate information from these views into a bigger picture. By utilizing multiple space-time cube representations (through the PolyCube framework), we discuss an effective approach to integrating and mediating multiple perspectives on cultural collection data. We illustrate its potential by the means of a case study on the work of Charles W. Cushman and outline first insights drawn from a heuristic evaluation. Finally, we situate our approach within the larger epistemic and methodological environment of humanities approaches to visualization design.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gerald Hiebel; Klaus Hanke;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications

    Abstract. The ancient mining landscape of Schwaz/Brixlegg in the Tyrol, Austria witnessed mining from prehistoric times to modern times creating a first order cultural landscape when it comes to one of the most important inventions in human history: the production of metal. In 1991 a part of this landscape was lost due to an enormous landslide that reshaped part of the mountain. With our work we want to propose a digital workflow to create a 3D semantic representation of this ancient mining landscape with its mining structures to preserve it for posterity. First, we define a conceptual model to integrate the data. It is based on the CIDOC CRM ontology and CRMgeo for geometric data. To transform our information sources to a formal representation of the classes and properties of the ontology we applied semantic web technologies and created a knowledge graph in RDF (Resource Description Framework). Through the CRMgeo extension coordinate information of mining features can be integrated into the RDF graph and thus related to the detailed digital elevation model that may be visualized together with the mining structures using Geoinformation systems or 3D visualization tools. The RDF network of the triple store can be queried using the SPARQL query language. We created a snapshot of mining, settlement and burial sites in the Bronze Age. The results of the query were loaded into a Geoinformation system and a visualization of known bronze age sites related to mining, settlement and burial activities was created.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jack Bowers; Laurent Romary;
    Publisher: OpenEdition
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    In this paper we provide a systematic and comprehensive set of modeling principles for representing etymological data in digital dictionaries using TEI. The purpose is to integrate in one coherent framework both digital representations of legacy dictionaries and born-digital lexical databases that are constructed manually or semi-automatically. We provide examples from many different types of etymological phenomena from traditional lexicographic practice, as well as analytical approaches from functional and cognitive linguistics such as metaphor, metonymy, and grammaticalization, which in many lexicographical and formal linguistic circles have not often been treated as truly etymological in nature, and have thus been largely left out of etymological dictionaries. In order to fully and accurately express the phenomena and their structures, we have made several proposals for expanding and amending some aspects of the existing TEI framework. Finally, with reference to both synchronic and diachronic data, we also demonstrate how encoders may integrate semantic web/linked open data information resources into TEI dictionaries as a basis for the sense, and/or the semantic domain, of an entry and/or an etymon.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Amelie Dorn; Eveline Wandl-Vogt; Davor Davidović; Roberto Barbera;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | EGI-Engage (654142)

    The rapid development of new digital tools and infrastructures in recent years and their application to a variety of disciplines has transformed how we store, access and retrieve information available to us. This has also shaped the ways how knowledge in a diverse cultural context is presented, used and re-used. The exploreAT! project builds upon not only Austrian, but also European cultural identity from the aspect of language, in particular dialects. Unlike standard languages, dialects are in times of globalization under considerable threat of diminishing, and this ultimately poses a risk to the intangible record that is language and through which a history of tangible culture is expressed. In this paper we elaborate on the possibilities digital means and the infrastructure and services of the EGI-Engage project offer in revealing and giving access to unique traditional cultural knowledge contained in a non-standard language resource on the example of the Bavarian dialects in Austria (DBÖ). Digital tools and services allow our heterogeneous corpus of data to be virtually exploited and preserved. The flexibility of the internet allow these data to become not only visible, but searchable and extractable. Through the digitization efforts, and use of European infrastructures the hidden cultural narratives within the data can be uncovered, enriched and shared for the benefit of knowledge society.