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The following results are related to DARIAH EU. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
18 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • DARIAH EU
  • 2018-2022
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  • GB
  • IL
  • DARIAH EU

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  • Publication . Report . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Szprot, Jakub; Arpagaus, Brigitte; Ciula, Arianna; Clivaz, Claire; Gabay, Simon; Honegger, Matthieu; Hughes, Lorna; Immenhauser, Beat; Jakeman, Neil; Lhotak, Martin; +8 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    This report provides information about activities and progress towards establishing DARIAH membership in six countries: the Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK, which took place between July and December 2019. Previous activities were described in detail in the D3.2 - Regularly Monitor Country-Specific Progress in Enabling New DARIAH Membership. During the project lifetime, the Czech Republic joined DARIAH ERIC; in other countries, collaboration with DARIAH has been greatly strengthened and significant progress regarding DARIAH membership has been achieved. The report also outlines the next steps in the accession processes, building on the results of the DESIR project.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tahko, Tuuli; Zehavi, Ora; Lhotak, Martin; Romanova, Natasha; Clivaz, Claire; Ros, Salvador; Raciti, Marco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | Locus Ludi (741520), EC | DESIR (731081)

    The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. The project was designed to address six core infrastructural sustainability dimensions and one of these was dedicated to training and education, which is also one of the four pillars identified in the DARIAH Strategic Plan 2019-2026. In the framework of Work Package 7: Teaching, DESIR organised dedicated workshops in the six DARIAH accession countries (Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) to introduce them to the DARIAH infrastructure and related services, and to develop methodological research skills. The topic of each workshop was decided by accession countries representatives according to the training needs of the national communities of researchers in the (Digital) Humanities. Training topics varied greatly: on the one hand, some workshops had the objective to introduce participants to specific methodological research skills; on the other hand, a different approach was used, and some events focused on the infrastructural role of training and education. The workshops organised in the context of Work Package 7: Teaching are listed below:• CZECH REPUBLIC: “A series of fall tutorials 2019 organized by LINDAT/CLARIAHCZ, tutorial #3 on TEI Training”, November 28, 2019, Prague;• FINLAND: “Reuse & sustainability: Open Science and social sciences and humanities research infrastructures”, 23 October 2019, Helsinki;• ISRAEL: “Introduction to Text Encoding and Digital Editions”, 24 October 2019, Haifa;• SPAIN: “DESIR Workshop: Digital Tools, Shared Data, and Research Dissemination”, 3 July 2019, Madrid;• SWITZERLAND: “Sharing the Experience: Workflows for the Digital Humanities”, 5-6 December 2019, Neuchâtel;• UNITED KINGDOM: “Research Software Engineering for Digital Humanities: Role of Training in Sustaining Expertise”, 9 December, London.

  • French
    Authors: 
    Ginouvès, Véronique; Gras, Isabelle;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; En guise de postface, il nous a semblé nécessaire de revenir sur le processus collaboratif de la fabrication de cet ouvrage et de vous confier la genèse de ce projet. Tout est parti d'un constat pragmatique, de nos situations quotidiennes de travail : le/la chercheur·e qui produit ou utilise des données a besoin de réponses concrètes aux questions auxquelles il/elle est confronté·e sur son terrain comme lors de tous ses travaux de recherche. Produire, exploiter, diffuser, partager ou éditer des sources numériques fait aujourd'hui partie de notre travail ordinaire. La rupture apportée par le développement du web et l'arrivée du format numérique ont largement facilité la diffusion et le partage des ressources (documentaires, textuelles, photographiques, sonores ou audiovisuelles...) dans le monde de la recherche et, au-delà, auprès des citoyens de plus en plus curieux et intéressés par les documents produits par les scientifiques.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilia Simeonova; Kiril Simov; Petya Osenova; Preslav Nakov;

    We propose a morphologically informed model for named entity recognition, which is based on LSTM-CRF architecture and combines word embeddings, Bi-LSTM character embeddings, part-of-speech (POS) tags, and morphological information. While previous work has focused on learning from raw word input, using word and character embeddings only, we show that for morphologically rich languages, such as Bulgarian, access to POS information contributes more to the performance gains than the detailed morphological information. Thus, we show that named entity recognition needs only coarse-grained POS tags, but at the same time it can benefit from simultaneously using some POS information of different granularity. Our evaluation results over a standard dataset show sizable improvements over the state-of-the-art for Bulgarian NER. named entity recognition; Bulgarian NER; morphology; morpho-syntax

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zamani, Maryam; Tejedor, Alejandro; Vogl, Malte; Krautli, Florian; Valleriani, Matteo; Kantz, Holger;

    We investigated the evolution and transformation of scientific knowledge in the early modern period, analyzing more than 350 different editions of textbooks used for teaching astronomy in European universities from the late fifteenth century to mid-seventeenth century. These historical sources constitute the Sphaera Corpus. By examining different semantic relations among individual parts of each edition on record, we built a multiplex network consisting of six layers, as well as the aggregated network built from the superposition of all the layers. The network analysis reveals the emergence of five different communities. The contribution of each layer in shaping the communities and the properties of each community are studied. The most influential books in the corpus are found by calculating the average age of all the out-going and in-coming links for each book. A small group of editions is identified as a transmitter of knowledge as they bridge past knowledge to the future through a long temporal interval. Our analysis, moreover, identifies the most disruptive books. These books introduce new knowledge that is then adopted by almost all the books published afterwards until the end of the whole period of study. The historical research on the content of the identified books, as an empirical test, finally corroborates the results of all our analyses. 19 pages, 9 figures

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    John A. Walsh; Peter J. Cobb; Wayne de Fremery; Koraljka Golub; Humphrey Keah; Jeonghyun Kim; Joseph Kiplang'at; Ying-Hsang Liu; Simon Mahony; Sam Gyun Oh; +3 more
    Publisher: Wiley

    The interdisciplinary field known as digital humanities (DH) is represented in various forms in the teaching and research practiced in iSchools. Building on the work of an iSchools organization committee charged with exploring digital humanities curricula, we present findings from a series of related studies exploring aspects of DH teaching, education, and research in iSchools, often in collaboration with other units and disciplines. Through a survey of iSchool programs and an online DH course registry, we investigate the various education models for DH training found in iSchools, followed by a detailed look at DH courses and curricula, explored through analysis of course syllabi and course descriptions. We take a brief look at collaborative disciplines with which iSchools cooperate on DH research projects or in offering DH education. Next, we explore DH careers through an analysis of relevant job advertisements. Finally, we offer some observations about the management and administrative challenges and opportunities related to offering a new iSchool DH program. Our results provide a snapshot of the current state of digital humanities in iSchools which may usefully inform the design and evolution of new DH programs, degrees, and related initiatives.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Helene Brinken; Iryna Kuchma; Vasso Kalaitzi; Joy Davidson; Nancy Pontika; Matteo Cancellieri; Antónia Correia; José Carvalho; Remedios Melero; Damjana Kastelic; +7 more
    Publisher: openjournals.nl
    Countries: Spain, Portugal, Germany, Portugal, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER Plus (741839), EC | FOSTER Plus (741839)

    To foster responsible research and innovation, research communities, institutions, and funders are shifting their practices and requirements towards Open Science. Open Science skills are becoming increasingly essential for researchers. Indeed general awareness of Open Science has grown among EU researchers, but the practical adoption can be further improved. Recognizing a gap between the needed and the provided training offer, the FOSTER project offers practical guidance and training to help researchers learn how to open up their research within a particular domain or research environment. Aiming for a sustainable approach, FOSTER focused on strengthening the Open Science training capacity by establishing and supporting a community of trainers. The creation of an Open Science training handbook was a first step towards bringing together trainers to share their experiences and to create an open and living knowledge resource. A subsequent series of train-the-trainer bootcamps helped trainers to find inspiration, improve their skills and to intensify exchange within a peer group. Four trainers, who attended one of the bootcamps, contributed a case study on their experiences and how they rolled out Open Science training within their own institutions. On its platform the project provides a range of online courses and resources to learn about key Open Science topics. FOSTER awards users gamification badges when completing courses in order to provide incentives and rewards, and to spur them on to even greater achievements in learning. The paper at hand describes FOSTER Plus’ training strategies, shares the lessons learnt and provides guidance on how to re-use the project’s materials and training approaches. Peer reviewed

  • Authors: 
    Georgios Artopoulos; Panayiotis Charalambous; Colter Eugene Wehmeier;
    Publisher: IGI Global

    This article reports on the technical development and testing of the basic components of a virtual environment platform that could be used for the cross-disciplinary study of complex urban realities, such as the historic city of Nicosia, Cyprus - the last divided capital of Europe. This platform captures data of virtual visitors' movements in space, and the article suggests that these data could help better understand the impact of planning scenarios and design interventions in open public spaces that used to be popular among the citizens of the historic city. The article presents how this platform uses interaction and immersion opportunities to engage citizens and stakeholders in the management of public open spaces that are associated with built heritage. Crowd simulation is discussed as a computational technique that when is combined with the presented virtual environment platform, and under the right conditions, would contribute to a digital practice for small-scale urban modelling. However, it is beyond the scope of this technical note to provide a full empirical testing and validation of the presented immersive virtual environment.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anna Foka; Osman Cenk Demiroglu; Elton Barker; Nasrin Mostofian; Kyriaki Konstantinidou; Brady Kiesling; Linda Talatas; Kajsa Palm;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract This progress article focuses on an overview of the potential and challenges of using contemporary Geographic Information System (GIS) applications for the visual rendering and analysis of textual spatial data. The case study is an ancient traveling narrative, Pausanias’s Description of Greece (Periegesis Hellados) which was written in the second century CE. First, we describe the process of converting the volumes to spatial data using a customized version of the open-source digital semantic annotation platform Recogito. Then the focus shifts to the implementation of collected and organized spatial data to a number of GIS applications: namely Google Maps, DARIAH Geo-Browser, Gephi, Palladio and ArcGIS. Through empirical experimentation with spatial data and their implementation in different platforms, our paper charts the ways in which contemporary GIS applications may be implemented to cast new light on ancient understandings of identity, space, and place.

  • Authors: 
    Mae Velloso-Lyons; Quinn Dombrowski; Kathryn Starkey;
    Publisher: University of Toronto Press Inc. (UTPress)

    This paper introduces the Global Medieval Sourcebook (GMS), an online repository of medieval texts and translations with an open network of contributors. Drawing on our experience developing and building this project in two phases over six years, we reflect on questions regarding editorial, curatorial, and translation practices, and on technical issues involved in the preparation, display, and preservation of texts for online publication. As an example of a scholar-led digital project, the trajectory of the GMS has broad relevance for scholars planning digital curation work of their own. In particular, it offers a salutary example of the infrastructural barriers to sustaining collaborative digital work and a possible model for preserving a concluded project.